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Curriculum Expectations:   Regular English 9/Honors English 9 (High School ELA)
Local VA Standards (End of Course Expectations)
Linked Core Standard:
By the end of Regular English 9/Honors English 9, the student will:


LVAS

Local VA Standard

Domain

1

--Increase their independence as learners of vocabulary.
--Use prefixes, suffixes, roots, derivations and inflections of polysyllabic words
--Evaluate the use of figurative language in text
-Read and evaluate a variety of non-fiction
-Understand the purpose of text structure and to locate information
-Use context and connotations to help determine the meaning of synonymous words
--Read and analyze a variety of nonfiction (informational/factual prose materials)
--Understand the purpose of text structures (problem-solution, cause/effect, ordered sequence, definition, description with a list)
--Understand before-, during-, and after-reading strategies
--Use context and connotations to help determine the meaning of synonyms

Reading

2

--Write narrative, expository, persuasive, and analytical pieces, and use the process of writing for prewriting, organizing, composing, revising, editing and publishing

Writing

3

--Acquire skills in evaluating resources.
--Embed information accessed electronically in a research project.
--Differentiate the original thoughts and ideas from the thoughts and ideas of others
--Use a standard style method (MLA, APA) to cite sources

Research

4

--Apply a process for reading as they analyze a variety of literature(classical and contemporary selections)
--Enhance understanding of various forms of literature (short stories)
--Understand social or cultural function depending on the time, location, and purpose of the author
--Understand parallel plots have separate but related story lines that merge together
--Use a variety of reading strategies (text annotation, QAR (Question-Answer Relationships), thinking aloud, etc.)

Reading

5

--Plan, compose, revise and edit writing in a variety of forms
--Writing will encompass narrative, expository, persuasive, and analytical forms
--Use the process for writing- prewriting, organizing, composing, revising, editing and publishing

Writing

6

--Apply a process for reading as they analyze a variety of literature(classical and contemporary selections)
--Enhance understanding of various forms of literature (short stories)
--Understand social or cultural function depending on the time, location, and purpose of the author
--Understand parallel plots have separate but related story lines that merge together
--Use a variety of reading strategies (text annotation, QAR (Question-Answer Relationships), thinking aloud, etc.)

Reading

7

-Plan, compose, revise and edit writing in a variety of forms
-Writing will encompass narrative, expository, persuasive, and analytical forms
-Use the process for writing- prewriting, organizing, composing, revising, editing and publishing

Writing

8

--Apply a process for reading as they analyze a variety of literature(classical and contemporary selections)
--Enhance understanding of various forms of literature (short stories)
--Understand social or cultural function depending on the time, location, and purpose of the author
--Understand parallel plots have separate but related story lines that merge together
--Use a variety of reading strategies (text annotation, QAR (Question-Answer Relationships), thinking aloud, etc.)

Reading

9

--Plan, compose, revise and edit writing in a variety of forms
--Writing will encompass narrative, expository, persuasive, and analytical forms
--Use the process for writing- prewriting, organizing, composing, revising, editing and publishing

Writing

10

--Acquire skills in evaluating resources.
--Embed information accessed electronically in a research project.
--Differentiate the original thoughts and ideas from the thoughts and ideas of others
--Use a standard style method (MLA, APA) to cite sources

Research

Instructional Objective (End of Term Expectations)


Term

Instructional Objective
Number

 Instructional Objective  (VASoL)

LVAS

1

English 9-3.212Research-O1.1

--Use internet resources, electronic databases, and other technology to access, organize, and present information
--Focus the topic
--Scan research information and select resources based on reliability, accuracy, and relevance
--Differentiate between reliable and unreliable resources
--Question validity and accuracy of information
--Avoid plagiarism
--Distinguish one's own ideas from information created or discovered by others
--Use a style sheet (MLA or APA), to cite sources

Honors English 9 Will: Read the fact/fiction novel Daughter of the Legend (Appalachian American Literature) and write a research paper about Melungeons (9.8.a, 9.8.b, 9.8.c, 9.8.d, 9.8.e, 9.8.f, 9.8.g, 9.8.h)

3

1

English 9-2.212Writing-O1.2

-Prewrite and organize writing
-Plan and develop organized and focused written products that demonstrate their understanding of composing, written expression, and usage/mechanics and that reflect an appropriate audience and purpose
-Demonstrate the purpose of writing as narrative, persuasive, expository, or analytical.
-Provide an engaging introduction and a clear thesis statement that introduces the information presented.
-Write clear, varied sentences, and increase the use of embedded clauses while also using specific vocabulary and information.
-Develop the topic with appropriate information, details, and examples.
-Arrange paragraphs into a logical progression using appropriate words or phrases to signal organizational pattern and transitions between ideas.
-Revise, writing for clarity, content, depth of information, and intended audience and purpose.
-Use a computer technology to assist in the writing process.
-Apply rules for sentence development, including:
-subject/verb;
-direct object
-indirect object
-predicate nominative; and
-predicate adjective
-Identify and appropriately use coordinating conjunctions: for, and, nor, but, or, yet, and so
-Use parallel structure when:
-linking coordinate ideas;
-comparing or contrasting ideas; and
-linking ideas with correlative conjunctions:
-both...and
-either..or
-neither...nor
not only...but also.
-Distinguish and divide main and subordinate clauses, using commas and semicolons.
-Use semicolon, or a conjunctive adverb to link two or more closely related independent clauses.
-Differentiate between active and passive voice to create a desired effect.
-Proofread and edit writing.
**Honors English 9 will:
Write a research paper about the Melungeon race (9.6.a, 9.6.b, 9.6.c, 9.6.d, 9.6.e, 9.6.f, 9.6.g, 9.6.h, 9.6.i, 9.7.a, 9.7.b, 9.7.c, 9.7.d, 9.7.e, 9.7.f)

2

1

English 9-1.212Reading-O1.3

-Students will use root or affixes to determine or clarify the meanings of words
-Recognize that words have nuances of meaning and that understanding the connotation may be necessary to determine appropriate meaning.
-demonstrate an understanding of idioms
-Analyze connotations of words and similar denotations
-Use context clues to determine the meaning of words and phrases
-Consult general and specialized reference materials
-demonstrate and understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and connotations in word meanings.
-identify main idea, purpose and supporting details
-Provide a summary of the text
-Identify the differing characteristics that distinguish literary forms
-Identify and analyze elements of dramatic literature.
-identify and explain the relationships among the elements of literature
-analyze character types in literary works
-analyze how plot structures (conflict, resolutions, climax, and subplots) advance the action in literature
-Determine a theme of a text and analyze its development
-Compare and contrast types of figurative language and other literary devices
-identify sound devices in a variety of literary texts.
-identify and analyze author's presentation of literary content by the use of structuring techniques
-Identify and analyze the author's use of diction and syntax to convey ideas and content
-Identify the main idea from a variety of informational text
-explain author's purpose
-analyze two or more texts with conflicting information on the same topic and identify how the texts disagree
-demonstrate the use of text feature to locate information
-Analyze text structures
-Make inferences and draw conclusions from informational texts.
**Honors English 9 will:
Read the fact/fiction novel Daughter of the Legend (A novel focusing on the Melungeon race in the Appalachian Mountains) (9.3.a, 9.3.b, 9.3.c, 9.3.d, 9.3.e, 9.3.f, 9.3.g, 9.5.a, 9.5.b, 9.5.c, 9.5.d, 9.5.e, 9.5.f, 9.5.g, 9.5.h, 9.5.i, 9.5.j, 9.5.k)

1

2

English 9-5.212Writing-O2.1

-Prewrite and organize writing
-Plan and develop organized and focused written products that demonstrate their understanding of composing, written expression, and usage/mechanics and that reflect an appropriate audience and purpose
-Demonstrate the purpose of writing as narrative, persuasive, expository, or analytical.
-Provide an engaging introduction and a clear thesis statement that introduces the information presented.
-Write clear, varied sentences, and increase the use of embedded clauses while also using specific vocabulary and information.
-Develop the topic with appropriate information, details, and examples.
-Arrange paragraphs into a logical progression using appropriate words or phrases to signal organizational pattern and transitions between ideas.
-Revise, writing for clarity, content, depth of information, and intended audience and purpose.
-Use a computer technology to assist in the writing process.
-Apply rules for sentence development, including:
-subject/verb;
-direct object
-indirect object
-predicate nominative; and
-predicate adjective
-Identify and appropriately use coordinating conjunctions: for, and, nor, but, or, yet, and so
-Use parallel structure when:
-linking coordinate ideas;
-comparing or contrasting ideas; and
-linking ideas with correlative conjunctions:
-both...and
-either..or
-neither...nor
not only...but also.
-Distinguish and divide main and subordinate clauses, using commas and semicolons.
-Use semicolon, or a conjunctive adverb to link two or more closely related independent clauses.
-Differentiate between active and passive voice to create a desired effect.
-Proofread and edit writing.
**Honors English 9 will:
Write an essay covering the prevalent themes in the novel Troy (9.6.a, 9.6.b, 9.6.c, 9.6.d, 9.6.e, 9.6.f, 9.6.g, 9.6.h, 9.6.i, 9.7.a, 9.7.b, 9.7.c, 9.7.d, 9.7.e, 9.7.f)

5

2

English 9-4.212Reading-O2.2

-Read various short stories and examples of mythology
Use roots or affixes to determine or clarify the meanings of words
-Recognize that words have nuances of meaning and that understanding the connotation may be necessary to determine appropriate meaning.
-Demonstrate an understanding of idioms
-Analyze connotations of words and similar denotations
-Use context clues to determine the meaning of words and phrases
-Consult general and specialized reference materials
-Demonstrate and understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and connotations in word meanings.
-Identify main idea, purpose and supporting details
-Provide a summary of the text
-Identify the differing characteristics that distinguish literary forms
-Identify and analyze elements of dramatic literature.
-Identify and explain the relationships among the elements of literature
-Analyze character types in literary works
-Analyze how plot structures (conflict, resolutions, climax, and subplots) advance the action in literature
-Determine a theme of a text and analyze its development
-Compare and contrast types of figurative language and other literary devices
-Identify sound devices in a variety of literary texts.
-Identify and analyze author's presentation of literary content by the use of structuring techniques
-Identify and analyze the author's use of diction and syntax to convey ideas and content
-Identify the main idea from a variety of informational text
-Explain author's purpose
-Analyze two or more texts with conflicting information on the same topic and identify how the texts disagree
-Demonstrate the use of text feature to locate information
-Analyze text structures
-Make inferences and draw conclusions from informational texts.
--Identify main idea, purpose, and supporting details
--Provide a summary of the text
--Identify the differing characteristics that distinguish literary forms (narrative, poetry, drama, essay, narrative nonfiction)
--Identify and analyze elements of dramatic literature (dramatic structure--exposition/initiating event, rising action, complication/conflict, climax, falling action, resolution/denouement (conclusion), monologue, soliloquy, dialogue, aside, dialect, stage directions)
--Identify and analyze elements of dramatic literature (dramatic structure--exposition/initiating event, rising action, complication/conflict, climax, falling action, resolution/denouement (conclusion), monologue, soliloquy, dialogue, aside, dialect, stage directions)
--Describe how stage directions help the reader understand a play's setting, mood, characters, plot, and theme
--Compare and contrast the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different media and analyze what is emphasized in each
--Explain the relationships among the elements of literature (protagonist and other characters, plot, setting, theme, tone, point of view (first person, third person limited, third person omniscient), speaker, narrator)
--Analyze techniques used by an author to convey information about a character
--Analyze character types (dynamic/round, static/flat, stereotype, caricature)
--Analyze how authors create multilayered characters through use of: indirect and direct methods of characterization, character's actions, interactions with other characters, dialogue, physical appearance, thoughts
--Analyze how characters with multiple motivations develop, interact, and advance the plot
--Analyze plot structures (conflict, resolution, climax, subplots)
--Determine theme
--Compare and contrast figurative language (simile, metaphor, personification, analogy, symbolism, apostrophe, allusion, imagery, paradox, oxymoron
--Identify sound devices (rhyme, rhythm, repetition, alliteration, assonance, consonance, onomatopoeia, parallelism)
--Identify and analyze structuring techniques (dialogue, foreshadowing, parallel plots, subplots/multiple story lines), flashback, soliloquy, verse, refrain, stanza forms (couplet, quatrain, sestet, octet(octave))
--Identify and analyze diction (word choice) and syntax (rhetorical question, cliche, connotation, denotation,  hyperbole, understatement, irony (dramatic/situational/verbal), dialect, pun)
**Honors English 9 will: Read Troy, a retelling of the Trojan War between the Greeks and the Trojans, and connect information to Greek Mythology (9.3.a, 9.3.b, 9.3.c, 9.3.d, 9.3.e, 9.3.f, 9.3.g, 9.4.a, 9.4.b, 9.4.c, 9.4.d, 9.4.e, 9.4.f, 9.4.g, 9.4.h, 9.4.i, 9.4.j, 9.4.k, 9.4.l, 9.4.m)

4

3

English 9-7.212Writing-O3.1

-Prewrite and organize writing
-Plan and develop organized and focused written products that demonstrate their understanding of composing, written expression, and usage/mechanics and that reflect an appropriate audience and purpose
-Demonstrate the purpose of writing as narrative, persuasive, expository, or analytical.
-Provide an engaging introduction and a clear thesis statement that introduces the information presented.
-Write clear, varied sentences, and increase the use of embedded clauses while also using specific vocabulary and information.
-Develop the topic with appropriate information, details, and examples.
-Arrange paragraphs into a logical progression using appropriate words or phrases to signal organizational pattern and transitions between ideas.
-Revise, writing for clarity, content, depth of information, and intended audience and purpose.
-Use a computer technology to assist in the writing process.
-Apply rules for sentence development, including:
-subject/verb;
-direct object
-indirect object
-predicate nominative; and
-predicate adjective
-Identify and appropriately use coordinating conjunctions: for, and, nor, but, or, yet, and so
-Use parallel structure when:
-linking coordinate ideas;
-comparing or contrasting ideas; and
-linking ideas with correlative conjunctions:
-both...and
-either..or
-neither...nor
not only...but also.
-Distinguish and divide main and subordinate clauses, using commas and semicolons.
-Use semicolon, or a conjunctive adverb to link two or more closely related independent clauses.
-Differentiate between active and passive voice to create a desired effect.
-Proofread and edit writing.
**Honors English 9 will:
Complete a Romeo and Juliet Portfolio consisting of: a eulogy written for one of the main characters who passed, a character analysis on one of the main characters, three diary entries from the perspective of one of the lesser characters, a compare and contrast essay comparing the original work to the newer version of the film, and a translation of the original text into a modern dialect (9.6.a, 9.6.b, 9.6.c, 9.6.d, 9.6.e, 9.6.f, 9.6.g, 9.6.h, 9.6.i, 9.7.a, 9.7.b, 9.7.c, 9.7.d, 9.7.e, 9.7.f)

7

3

English 9-6.212Reading-O3.2

-Read examples of Drama (one-act and full-length plays) and various poems
Use root or affixes to determine or clarify the meanings of words
-recognize that words have nuances of meaning and that understanding the connotation may be necessary to determine appropriate meaning.
-demonstrate an understanding of idioms
-analyze connotations of words and similar denotations
-use context clues to determine the meaning of words and phrases
-consult general and specialized reference materials
-demonstrate and understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and connotations in word meanings.
-identify main idea, purpose and supporting details
-provide a summary of the text
-identify the differing characteristics that distinguish literary forms
-identify and analyze elements of dramatic literature.
-identify and explain the relationships among the elements of literature
-analyze character types in literary works
-analyze how plot structures (conflict, resolutions, climax, and subplots) advance the action in literature
-determine a theme of a text and analyze its development
-compare and contrast types of figurative language and other literary devices
-identify sound devices in a variety of literary texts.
-identify and analyze author's presentation of literary content by the use of structuring techniques
-identify and analyze the author's use of diction and syntax to convey ideas and content
-identify the main idea from a variety of informational text
-explain author's purpose
-analyze two or more texts with conflicting information on the same topic and identify how the texts disagree
-demonstrate the use of text feature to locate information
-analyze text structures
-make inferences and draw conclusions from informational texts.
--Identify main idea, purpose, and supporting details
--Provide a summary of the text
--Identify the differing characteristics that distinguish literary forms (narrative, poetry, drama, essay, narrative nonfiction)
--Identify and analyze elements of dramatic literature (dramatic structure--exposition/initiating event, rising action, complication/conflict, climax, falling action, resolution/denouement (conclusion), monologue, soliloquy, dialogue, aside, dialect, stage directions)
--Describe how stage directions help the reader understand a play's setting, mood, characters, plot, and theme
--Compare and contrast the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different media and analyze what is emphasized in each
--Explain the relationships among the elements of literature (protagonist and other characters, plot, setting, theme, tone, point of view (first person, third person limited, third person omniscient), speaker, narrator)
--Analyze techniques used by an author to convey information about a character
--Analyze character types (dynamic/round, static/flat, stereotype, caricature)
--Analyze how authors create multilayered characters through use of: indirect and direct methods of characterization, character's actions, interactions with other characters, dialogue, physical appearance, thoughts
--Analyze how characters with multiple motivations develop, interact, and advance the plot
--Analyze plot structures (conflict, resolution, climax, subplots)
--Determine theme
--Compare and contrast figurative language (simile, metaphor, personification, analogy, symbolism, apostrophe, allusion, imagery, paradox, oxymoron
--Identify sound devices (rhyme, rhythm, repetition, alliteration, assonance, consonance, onomatopoeia, parallelism)
--Identify and analyze structuring techniques (dialogue, foreshadowing, parallel plots, subplots/multiple story lines), flashback, soliloquy, verse, refrain, stanza forms (couplet, quatrain, sestet, octet(octave))
--Identify and analyze diction (word choice) and syntax (rhetorical question, cliche, connotation, denotation,  hyperbole, understatement, irony (dramatic/situational/verbal), dialect, pun)
**Honors English 9 will:
Read Romeo and Juliet in aloud in class (9.3.a, 9.3.b, 9.3.c, 9.3.d, 9.3.e, 9.3.f, 9.3.g, 9.4.a, 9.4.b, 9.4.c, 9.4.d, 9.4.e, 9.4.f, 9.4.g, 9.4.h, 9.4.i, 9.4.j, 9.4.k, 9.4.l, 9.4.m)

6

4

English 9-10.212Research-O4.1

--Use internet resources, electronic databases, and other technology to access, organize, and present information
--Focus the topic
--Scan research information and select resources based on reliability, accuracy, and relevance
--Differentiate between reliable and unreliable resources
--Question validity and accuracy of information
--Avoid plagiarism
--Distinguish one's own ideas from information created or discovered by others
--Use a style sheet (MLA or APA), to cite sources
**Honors English 9 will: (9.8.a, 9.8.b, 9.8.c, 9.8.d, 9.8.e, 9.8.f, 9.8.g, 9.8.h)

10

4

English 9-9.212Writing-O4.2

-Prewrite and organize writing
-Plan and develop organized and focused written products that demonstrate their understanding of composing, written expression, and usage/mechanics and that reflect an appropriate audience and purpose
-Demonstrate the purpose of writing as narrative, persuasive, expository, or analytical.
-Provide an engaging introduction and a clear thesis statement that introduces the information presented.
-Write clear, varied sentences, and increase the use of embedded clauses while also using specific vocabulary and information.
-Develop the topic with appropriate information, details, and examples.
-Arrange paragraphs into a logical progression using appropriate words or phrases to signal organizational pattern and transitions between ideas.
-Revise, writing for clarity, content, depth of information, and intended audience and purpose.
-Use a computer technology to assist in the writing process.
-Apply rules for sentence development, including:
-subject/verb;
-direct object
-indirect object
-predicate nominative; and
-predicate adjective
-Identify and appropriately use coordinating conjunctions: for, and, nor, but, or, yet, and so
-Use parallel structure when:
-linking coordinate ideas;
-comparing or contrasting ideas; and
-linking ideas with correlative conjunctions:
-both...and
-either..or
-neither...nor
not only...but also.
-Distinguish and divide main and subordinate clauses, using commas and semicolons.
-Use semicolon, or a conjunctive adverb to link two or more closely related independent clauses.
-Differentiate between active and passive voice to create a desired effect.
-Proofread and edit writing.
**Honors English 9 will: (9.6.a, 9.6.b, 9.6.c, 9.6.d, 9.6.e, 9.6.f, 9.6.g, 9.6.h, 9.6.i, 9.7.a, 9.7.b, 9.7.c, 9.7.d, 9.7.e, 9.7.f)

9

4

English 9-8.212Reading-O4.3

-Focus on novel study
-Use roots or affixes to determine or clarify the meanings of words
-Recognize that words have nuances of meaning and that understanding the connotation may be necessary to determine appropriate meaning.
-Demonstrate an understanding of idioms
-analyze connotations of words and similar denotations
-use context clues to determine the meaning of words and phrases
-consult general and specialized reference materials
-Demonstrate and understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and connotations in word meanings.
-Identify main idea, purpose and supporting details
-provide a summary of the text
-identify the differing characteristics that distinguish literary forms
-identify and analyze elements of dramatic literature.
-identify and explain the relationships among the elements of literature
-analyze character types in literary works
-analyze how plot structures (conflict, resolutions, climax, and subplots) advance the action in literature
-determine a theme of a text and analyze its development
-compare and contrast types of figurative language and other literary devices
-identify sound devices in a variety of literary texts.
-identify and analyze author's presentation of literary content by the use of structuring techniques
-identify and analyze the author's use of diction and syntax to convey ideas and content
-identify the main idea from a variety of informational text
-explain author's purpose
-analyze two or more texts with conflicting information on the same topic and identify how the texts disagree
-demonstrate the use of text feature to locate information
-analyze text structures
-make inferences and draw conclusions from informational texts.
--Identify main idea, purpose, and supporting details
--Provide a summary of the text
--Identify the differing characteristics that distinguish literary forms (narrative, poetry, drama, essay, narrative nonfiction)
--Identify and analyze elements of dramatic literature (dramatic structure--exposition/initiating event, rising action, complication/conflict, climax, falling action, resolution/denouement (conclusion), monologue, soliloquy, dialogue, aside, dialect, stage directions)
--Identify and analyze elements of dramatic literature (dramatic structure--exposition/initiating event, rising action, complication/conflict, climax, falling action, resolution/denouement (conclusion), monologue, soliloquy, dialogue, aside, dialect, stage directions)
--Describe how stage directions help the reader understand a play's setting, mood, characters, plot, and theme
--Compare and contrast the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different media and analyze what is emphasized in each
--Explain the relationships among the elements of literature (protagonist and other characters, plot, setting, theme, tone, point of view (first person, third person limited, third person omniscient), speaker, narrator)
--Analyze techniques used by an author to convey information about a character
--Analyze character types (dynamic/round, static/flat, stereotype, caricature)
--Analyze how authors create multilayered characters through use of: indirect and direct methods of characterization, character's actions, interactions with other characters, dialogue, physical appearance, thoughts
--Analyze how characters with multiple motivations develop, interact, and advance the plot
--Analyze plot structures (conflict, resolution, climax, subplots)
--Determine theme
--Compare and contrast figurative language (simile, metaphor, personification, analogy, symbolism, apostrophe, allusion, imagery, paradox, oxymoron
--Identify sound devices (rhyme, rhythm, repetition, alliteration, assonance, consonance, onomatopoeia, parallelism)
--Identify and analyze structuring techniques (dialogue, foreshadowing, parallel plots, subplots/multiple story lines), flashback, soliloquy, verse, refrain, stanza forms (couplet, quatrain, sestet, octet(octave))
--Identify and analyze diction (word choice) and syntax (rhetorical question, cliche, connotation, denotation,  hyperbole, understatement, irony (dramatic/situational/verbal), dialect, pun)
-Students will use root or affixes to determine or clarify the meanings of words
-recognize that words have nuances of meaning and that understanding the connotation may be necessary to determine appropriate meaning.
-demonstrate an understanding of idioms
-Analyze connotations of words and similar denotations
-Use context clues to determine the meaning of words and phrases
-Consult general and specialized reference materials
-demonstrate and understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and connotations in word meanings.
-identify main idea, purpose and supporting details
-Provide a summary of the text
-Identify the differing characteristics that distinguish literary forms
-Identify and analyze elements of dramatic literature.
-identify and explain the relationships among the elements of literature
-analyze character types in literary works
-analyze how plot structures (conflict, resolutions, climax, and subplots) advance the action in literature
-Determine a theme of a text and analyze its development
-Compare and contrast types of figurative language and other literary devices
-identify sound devices in a variety of literary texts.
-identify and analyze author's presentation of literary content by the use of structuring techniques
-Identify and analyze the author's use of diction and syntax to convey ideas and content
-Identify the main idea from a variety of informational text
-Explain author's purpose
-analyze two or more texts with conflicting information on the same topic and identify how the texts disagree
-demonstrate the use of text feature to locate information
-Analyze text structures
-Make inferences and draw conclusions from informational texts.
**Honors English 9 will: (9.3.a, 9.3.b, 9.3.c, 9.3.d, 9.3.e, 9.3.f, 9.3.g, 9.4.a, 9.4.b, 9.4.c, 9.4.d, 9.4.e, 9.4.f, 9.4.g, 9.4.h, 9.4.i, 9.4.j, 9.4.k, 9.4.l, 9.4.m, 9.5.a, 9.5.b, 9.5.c, 9.5.d, 9.5.e, 9.5.f, 9.5.g, 9.5.h, 9.5.i, 9.5.j, 9.5.k)

8

Curriculum Expectations:   Regular English 10/Honors English 10 (High School ELA)
Local VA Standards (End of Course Expectations)
Linked Core Standard:
By the end of Regular English 10/Honors English 10, the student will:


LVAS

Local VA Standard

Domain

1

-Analyze literature by reading a variety of short stories and non-fiction pieces from the textbook.
-Identify key literary terms as well as author''s intent and purpose.
-Students will locate information in non-fiction pieces and compare and contrast to fictional pieces.

Reading

2

-Write essays with a focus on persuasions on a variety of writing prompts related to the Standards of Learning Writing test.
-Develop written products that demonstrate their understanding of composing, written expression and usage/mechanics.
-Develop writing that analyzes complex issues and write persuasively and analytically on a variety of literary and non-literary subjects.

Writing

3

-Understand poetic techniques to evoke emotion in the reader.
-Interpret and paraphrase the meanings of poems to demonstrate the understanding of the poem.
-Analyze how an author achieves specific effects and purposes using literary devices and figurative language.
-Read and analyze poetry focusing on rhyme, rhythm and sound.

Reading

4

-Analyze the use of dialogue, special effects, music and set to interpret characters in an essay.
-identify and describe dramatic conventions
-compare and contrast literary devices in order to convey a poem''s message and illicit a reader''s emotions through written product.
-Develop ideas deductively and inductively and organize ideas into a logical sequence.

Writing

5

-Understand steps involved in organizing information gathered from research.
-Verify the accuracy and usefulness of information.
-Understand the appropriate format for citing sources of information.
-Understand that using standard methods of documentation is one way to protect the intellectual property of writers.

Research

6

-Recognize that media messages express a viewpoint and contain values.
-Understand that there is a relationship between the author''s intent, the factual intent, and opinion expressed in media messages.
-Understand the purposeful use of persuasive language and word connotations convey viewpoint and bias.

Communication: Speaking, Listening, Media Literacy

7

-Use MLA style manual to punctuate and format sentences and text.
-Understand how writers use organization and details to communicate their purposes.
-Analyze writings critically, using knowledge of composition, written expression, sentence formation, and usage/mechanics. They will also suggest ways that writings can be improved.
-Use colons according to rules governing their use.

Writing

8

-Understand that background knowledge may be necessary to understand handbooks and manuals.
-Know that informational and technical writing is often non-linear, fragmented, and graphic-supported.
-Understand how format and style in informational texts differ from those in narrative and expository texts.
-Understand reading strategies are used to locate specific information in informational texts.

Reading

Instructional Objective (End of Term Expectations)


Term

Instructional Objective
Number

 Instructional Objective  (VASoL)

LVAS

1

Regular English 10/Honors English 10-1.213Writing-O1.1

-Students will demonstrate the writing process in a variety of short essays that show organization, a thesis and elaborate ideas to support their thesis.
(10.4.a, 10.4.b, 10.4.c, 10.4.d, 10.4.e, 10.4.f, 10.4.g, 10.4.h, 10.4.i, 10.4.m, 10.5.a, 10.5.b, 10.5.c, 10.5.d, 10.5.e, 10.5.f, 10.5.g, 10.5.h)

1

1

Regular English 10/Honors English 10-1.213Writing-O1.2

Students will vary sentence structure, use visual and sensory language, show unity and coherence, tone and voice, clear purpose and accurate and valuable information. (10.4.a, 10.4.b, 10.4.c, 10.4.d, 10.4.e, 10.4.f, 10.4.g, 10.4.h, 10.4.i, 10.4.m, 10.5.a, 10.5.b, 10.5.c, 10.5.d, 10.5.e, 10.5.f, 10.5.g, 10.5.h)

1

1

Regular English 10/Honors English 10-1.213Reading-O1.4

-Students will write an analytical paper on a short story of their choice.
-Students will analyze how relationships among a character's actions, dialogue, physical attributes, thoughts, feelings and other characters reveal nuances of the character advance the character.
(10.4.a, 10.4.b, 10.4.c, 10.4.d, 10.4.e, 10.4.f, 10.4.g, 10.4.h, 10.4.i, 10.4.m, 10.5.a, 10.5.b, 10.5.c, 10.5.d, 10.5.e, 10.5.f, 10.5.g, 10.5.h)

1

1

Regular English 10/Honors English 10-1.213Reading-O1.6

-Students will use reading strategies to improve comprehension and to achieve the purposes for reading; predicting and adjusting predictions;  (10.4.a, 10.4.b, 10.4.c, 10.4.d, 10.4.e, 10.4.f, 10.4.g, 10.4.h, 10.4.i, 10.4.m, 10.5.a, 10.5.b, 10.5.c, 10.5.d, 10.5.e, 10.5.f, 10.5.g, 10.5.h)

1

1

Regular English 10/Honors English 10-1.213Reading-O1.7

-Students will question the text and restate main idea and summarize supporting details. (10.4.a, 10.4.b, 10.4.c, 10.4.d, 10.4.e, 10.4.f, 10.4.g, 10.4.h, 10.4.i, 10.4.m, 10.5.a, 10.5.b, 10.5.c, 10.5.d, 10.5.e, 10.5.f, 10.5.g, 10.5.h)

1

2

Regular English 10/Honors English 10-4.213Writing-O2.1

-Students will compare and contrast poems in writing identifying literary techniques, author's purpose and reader's response.
(10.6 .a, 10.6 .b, 10.6 .c, 10.6 .d, 10.6 .e, 10.6 .f, 10.6 .g)

4

2

Regular English 10/Honors English 10-4.213Writing-O2.2

-Students will construct meaning from dramatic pieces and write a character analysis of their choosing.
-Students will create their own dramatic projects using asides, monologues and soliloquies. (10.6 .a, 10.6 .b, 10.6 .c, 10.6 .d, 10.6 .e, 10.6 .f, 10.6 .g)

4

2

Regular English 10/Honors English 10-2.213Reading-O2.3

-Students will construct meaning from text by making connections between what they know and the new information that they read.
-Students will identify literary devices in order to convey a poem's message and illicit a reader's emotions.
-Students will evaluate how asides, monologues and soliloquies focus on a single character.
-Students will understand rhyme, rhythm and sound elements and create their own poems.  (10.6 .a, 10.6 .b, 10.6 .c, 10.6 .d, 10.6 .e, 10.6 .f)

2

3

Regular English 10/Honors English 10-5.213Research-O3.1

Create a research project that would use their information on the topic options handed out by the teacher, and create a researched writing. (10.8 .a, 10.8 .b, 10.8 .c, 10.8.d, 10.8 .e, 10.8 .f)

5

3

Regular English 10/Honors English 10-6.213Communication: Speaking, Listening, Media Literacy-O3.2

-Students will identify and analyze the sources and viewpoint of publications.
-Students will analyze, compare, and contrast visual and verbal media messages for content, intent, impact and effectiveness.
-Students will determine author's purpose, factual content, opinion, and/or possible bias as presented in media messages. (10.2.a, 10.2.b, 10.2.c, 10.2.d)

6

3

Regular English 10/Honors English 10-5.213Research-O3.3

-Students will use technology, along with other resources, to gather information from various sources by summarizing, paraphrasing, and supporting a thesis.
-Students will organize information and maintain coherence throughout the writing based on the topic, purpose, and audience.
-Students will use organizational patterns/techniques.
-Students will evaluate sources for credibility, reliability, strengths, and limitations.
-Students will demonstrate ability to distinguish between reliable and unreliable sources.
-Students will distinguish one's own ideas from information created or discovered by others.
-Students will cite primary and secondary sources of information, using the MLA method of documentation of in-text citations and works-cited pages. (10.8 .a, 10.8 .b, 10.8 .c, 10.8.d, 10.8 .e, 10.8 .f)

5

3

Regular English 10/Honors English 10-7.213Writing-O3.4

-Students will create a research project that will distinguish between active voice and passive voice to convey an desired effect.
-Students will know and apply rules for the use of a colon.
-Students will use direct quotations in their writing, applying MLA for punctuation and formatting.
-Students will correct grammatical or usage errors. (10.7 .a, 10.7 .b, 10.7 .c, 10.7 .d, 10.7 .e, 10.7 .f, 10.7 .g, 10.7 .h)

7

3

Regular English 10/Honors English 10-3.213Reading-O3.5

-Students will compare and contrast literary devices in order to convey a  poem's message and elicit a reader's emotions.
-Students will interpret and paraphrase the meanings of selected poems.
-Students will explain similarities and differences among literary genres from different cultures, such as haikus, sonnets, villanelle, tankas, etc. (10.4.a, 10.4.b, 10.4.c, 10.4.d, 10.4.h, 10.4.k, 10.4.l, 10.4.m)

3

4

Regular English 10/Honors English 10-8.213Reading-O4.1

-Students will identify the different formats and purposes of informational and technical texts.
-Students will analyze how authors use rhetoric to advance their point of view.
-Students will identify the main idea(s) in informational text.
-Students will identify essential details in complex informational passages.
-Students will locate specific information in manuals or other informational sources by using strategies such as skimming, summarizing, and highlighting.
-Students will interpret and understand information presented in maps, charts, timelines, tables, and diagrams.
-Students will make inferences and draw conclusions form informational texts.
(10.4.a, 10.4.b, 10.5.a, 10.5.b, 10.5.c, 10.5.d, 10.5.e, 10.5.f, 10.5.g, 10.5.h)

8

Curriculum Expectations:   Regular English 11/Honors English 11 (High School ELA)
Local VA Standards (End of Course Expectations)
Linked Core Standard:
By the end of Regular English 11/Honors English 11, the student will:


LVAS

Local VA Standard

Domain

1

**Give effective information and persuasive presentations, using appropriate oral-communication skills.
**Use grammatically correct language in preparation and presentation of ideas and thoughts.
**Become critical listeners by assessing the effectiveness of oral presentations

 

Communication: Speaking, Listening, Media Literacy

2

**Increase their independence as learners of vocabulary.
**Use prefixes, suffixes, roots, derivations, and inflections or polysyllabic words to determine meaning and relationships among related words.
**Students will evaluate the use of figurative language in text
**Students will use context and connotations to help determine the meaning of synonymous words.
**Understand literature as it relates to the cultural and historical period in which it was written (recognize how authors are influenced by the ideas and values of their times)
**Students will read, analyze, critique, and compare a variety of contemporary and traditional poetry
**Students will read and critique a variety of dramatic selections
**Read, understand, and use a variety of informational texts.  They will also develop specific reading skills in order to generalize ideas, make predictions, and follow directions.
**Recognize persuasive techniques such as: ad hominem, red herring, straw man, and begging the question.

Reading

3

**Use a process for writing to communicate clearly and persuasively.
**Support a position by selecting valid information and amplifying their text logically.
**Understand that active constructions are preferred.
**Students will avoid false premises in writing.
**Students will write clear and accurate personal, professional, and informational correspondence.
**Use a style manual, such as MLA or APA, in producing research projects.
**Understand and apply rules for the use of verbals and verbal phrases.
**Understand active voice is preferable to passive voice.

Writing

4

**Students will continue to develop media literacy by examining how media messages influence people's beliefs and behaviors

Communication: Speaking, Listening, Media Literacy

5

**Increase vocabulary
**Use prefixes, suffixes, roots, derivations, and inflections or polysyllabic words to determine meaning and relationships among related words.
**Students will evaluate the use of figurative language in text
**Students will use context and connotations to help determine the meaning of synonymous words.

Reading

6

**Use a process for writing to communicate clearly and persuasively.
**Support a position by selecting valid information and amplifying their text logically.
**Understand that active constructions are preferred.
**Students will avoid false premises in writing.
**Students will write clear and accurate personal, professional, and informational correspondence.
**Use a style manual, such as MLA or APA, in producing research projects.
**Understand and apply rules for the use of verbals and verbal phrases.
**Understand active voice is preferable to passive voice.

Writing

7

**Compose a documented research product that is based on valid resources and procedures.
**Collect, organize, and evaluate the quality and accuracy of information to ensure that it is current, factual, and reliable.
**Recognize consequences of plagiarism according to the guidelines established by school divisions.

Research

8

**Increase vocabulary
**Use prefixes, suffixes, roots, derivations, and inflections or polysyllabic words to determine meaning and relationships among related words.
**Students will evaluate the use of figurative language in text
**Students will use context and connotations to help determine the meaning of synonymous words.

Reading

9

**Use a process for writing to communicate clearly and persuasively.
**Support a position by selecting valid information and amplifying their text logically.
**Understand that active constructions are preferred.
**Students will avoid false premises in writing.
**Students will write clear and accurate personal, professional, and informational correspondence.
**Use a style manual, such as MLA or APA, in producing research projects.
**Understand and apply rules for the use of verbals and verbal phrases.
**Understand active voice is preferable to passive voice.

Writing

10

**Give effective information and persuasive presentations, using appropriate oral-communication skills.
**Use grammatically correct language in preparation and presentation of ideas and thoughts.
**Become critical listeners by assessing the effectiveness of oral presentations
**Students will continue to develop media literacy by examining how media messages influence people's beliefs and behaviors

Communication: Speaking, Listening, Media Literacy

11

**Increase their independence as learners of vocabulary.
**Use prefixes, suffixes, roots, derivations, and inflections or polysyllabic words to determine meaning and relationships among related words.
**Students will evaluate the use of figurative language in text
**Students will use context and connotations to help determine the meaning of synonymous words.
**Understand literature as it relates to the cultural and historical period in which it was written (recognize how authors are influenced by the ideas and values of their times)
**Students will read, analyze, critique, and compare a variety of contemporary and traditional poetry
**Students will read and critique a variety of dramatic selections
**Read, understand, and use a variety of informational texts.  They will also develop specific reading skills in order to generalize ideas, make predictions, and follow directions.
**Recognize persuasive techniques such as: ad hominem, red herring, straw man, and begging the question.

Reading

12

**Use a process for writing to communicate clearly and persuasively.
**Support a position by selecting valid information and amplifying their text logically.
**Understand that active constructions are preferred.
**Students will avoid false premises in writing.
**Students will write clear and accurate personal, professional, and informational correspondence.
**Use a style manual, such as MLA or APA, in producing research projects.
**Understand and apply rules for the use of verbals and verbal phrases.
**Understand active voice is preferable to passive voice.

Writing

13

**Compose a documented research product that is based on valid resources and procedures.
**Collect, organize, and evaluate the quality and accuracy of information to ensure that it is current, factual, and reliable.
**Recognize consequences of plagiarism according to the guidelines established by school divisions.

Research

Instructional Objective (End of Term Expectations)


Term

Instructional Objective
Number

 Instructional Objective  (VASoL)

LVAS

1

Regular English 11-1.214Communication: Speaking, Listening, Media Literacy-O1.1

**Define a position and select evidence to support a position
**Establish a purpose
**Develop well-organized presentations to defend a position or present information
**Apply and evaluate persuasive rhetorical devices and techniques (rhetorical questioning, parallel structure, metaphor, imagery, figures of speech, alliterative expressions, etc.)
**Use effective evidence and oral-delivery skills to convince an audience
**Develop effective multimedia presentations

Honors English 11 Will:

 (11.1.a, 11.1.b, 11.1.c, 11.1.d, 11.1.e, 11.1.f, 11.1.g, 11.1.h)

1

1

Regular English 11-2.214Reading-O1.2

**Use roots and affixes to determine or clarify the meaning of words
**Demonstrate an understanding of idioms
**Identify allusions
**Interpret figures of speech (euphemism, oxymoron, hyperbole, paradox)
**Identify connotations of words with similar denotations
**Use context clues
**Consult reference materials to find pronunciation, meaning, part of speech, and etymology
**Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationship, and connotations in word meanings
**Use reading strategies to improve understanding (predicting, questioning, restating main idea, summarizing, and close reading)
**Analyze and critique themes across texts and within various social, cultural, and historical contexts and discuss how the subject matter, style, literary type, theme, and purpose reflect the culture and events of the times in which the works were written
**Compare and contrast literary movements (Colonialism/Puritanism, Revolutionary/Rationalism, Romanticism/Transcendentalism/Regionalism/Realism/Naturalism, Symbolism/Modernism/Harlem Renaissance/Postmodernism, Contemporary Poetry)
**Differentiate among archetypal characters (hero/heroine, trickster, faithful companion, outsider/outcast, rugged individualist, innocent, villain, caretaker, Earth mother, rebel, misfit, lonely orphan, shrew, mother/father figure, monster/villain, scapegoat)
**Identify major themes (American Dream, loss of innocence, coming of age, relationship with nature/society/science, alienation/isolation, survival of the fittest, disillusionment, rebellion/protest

In addition to the aforementioned, Honors English 11 will:
No matter the genre of literature, effective readers must actively interact with text.  Throughout the year, students can expect to study various modes of texts:
o              Short stories                        
o              Poetry
o              Novel
o              Nonfiction
The readers’ ability to infer (come to a conclusion or form an opinion about something on the basis of evidence or reasoning) both explicitly and implicitly are crucial components to effective reading comprehension at not only the secondary level but the collegiate, as well.
During the fourth nine weeks, students are expected to develop and maintain a Reader’s Notebook.  Readers will be expected to closely interact with various selections following stringent criteria.  These “interactions” must be housed within the Reader’s Notebook.
In the educational field, Professor Arthur Costa’s  3 – Level Inquiries has proven to be one of the most beneficial reading comprehension strategies.  If utilized correctly while reading, readers will comprehend literature successfully on many levels.
Level 1  – Explicit Questions:   These questions can be posed and answered directly from the text.
(define, describe, identify, name, recite, etc.)

Examples:               In order to help others on their journey, what object is offered by the fellow traveler in “Young Goodman Brown”? 

                                What object, belonging to Faith, hangs from a tree limb?                           

Level 2 – Implicit Questions:  These questions can be inferred from the text, but readers must analyze, compare, contrast, synthesize, etc.

Examples:              Early in the tale, Goodman Brown expresses his desire to return home, yet he continues to walk with his traveling companion.  What does this reveal about him?

                                What does Brown’s conversation with his wife and his conversation with the fellow traveler reveal about his personality?

Level 3 – Transcending Questions:   These questions go beyond what is stated or implied in the text.  Readers must speculate, evaluate, apply, hypothesize, etc.

Examples:              Goodman Brown dies a miserable man seemingly disillusioned by his peers.  What does                                         this behavior reveal about human nature?

Examine the customs and practices of the characters in this piece.  What does their   behavior reveal about the period in which the story is set?

With most (teacher discretion) works of literature, students are expected to annotate using the following criteria:

o              Circle phrases/concepts that are repetitive.  Many times themes, symbols, motifs, and figurative language are being established through repetition.
o              Underline sentences that stand out, develop an argument, or make a point.
o              [Bracket] important sections of text.
o              Summarize each paragraph/stanza in the margin.
o              Box words that need to be defined,  and define in the margin.  
o              Other annotating guidelines may be added as students read more specialized texts and subject matters.

In addition, Honors English 11 students must complete the following steps, which are directly relevant to the increases rigor of the Standards of Learning:
1.  Annotate each selection by following the aforementioned criteria. 
2.  Create one Level 1- Explicit Question.  Provide the answer as well.
3.  Create one Level 2 – Implicit Question.  Provide the answer as well.
4.  Create one Level 3 – Transcending Question.  Provide the answer as well.
5.  What is the main idea/main purpose/theme/author’s purpose in the passage? 
o              After responding in your words,  add key phrases from the selection that brought you to this conclusion.
6.  What is the main focus of each paragraph? 
o              After responding in your words,  add key phrases from the selection that brought you to this conclusion.
7.  Identify at least one upper level vocabulary word.  Define it based solely on the context clues surrounding that word.
8.  What is the tone of the selection?  Write down words from the text that establish the tone.
9.  List any archetypes present in the selection with a brief explanation.  Recall that you were given extensive notes during the first semester regarding literary archetypes (hero/heroine, trickster, faithful companion, outsider/outcast, rugged individualist, innocent, villain, caretaker, Earth mother, rebel, misfit, lonely orphan, shrew, mother/father figure, monster/villain, scapegoat, etc.)
10.  If reading poetry, address/label the following areas as they pertain to the subject, mood, and theme:
Rhyme    Rhythm  Onomatopoeia
Repetition             Alliteration            Assonance
Parallelism             Number Stanzas   Diction

 (11.3.a, 11.3.b, 11.3.c, 11.3.d, 11.3.e, 11.3.f, 11.3.g, 11.4.a, 11.4.b, 11.4.c, 11.4.d, 11.4.e, 11.4.f, 11.4.g, 11.4.h, 11.4.i, 11.4.j, 11.4.k, 11.5.a, 11.5.b, 11.5.c, 11.5.d, 11.5.e, 11.5.f, 11.5.g, 11.5.h)

2

1

Regular English 11-3.214Writing-O1.3

**Apply a variety of planning strategies to generate and organize ideas
**Present a thesis that focuses on the problem or argument to be solved
**Anticipate and address counterevidence, counterclaims, and counterarguments

In addition to the aforementioned, Honors English 11 will:
**Use effective rhetorical appeals, to establish credibility and persuade intended audience
**Refine thesis (relevant, interesting, logical, meaningful)
**Understand a variety of organizational patterns
**Use appropriate and varied transitions to link sentences and paragraphs
**Elaborate ideas clearly and accurately
**Show evidence supporting arguments and justify evidence credibility
**Introduce claim, acknowledge and distinguish the claim from alternate or opposing claims
**Organize reasons and evidence logically
**Use specific revision strategies and adapt content, vocabulary, voice, and tone to audience, purpose, and situation
**Select an appropriate audience by analyzing assumptions, values, and background knowledge
**Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting facts, details, quotations, and examples for the audience and purpose
**Use MLA (Modern Language Association) or APA (American Psychological Association) style for formatting rules and documentation
**Apply MLA or APA style for punctuation conventions and formatting direct quotations
**Use verbal phrases correctly (gerund phrase, infinitive phrase, participial phrase, and absolute phrase)
**Place main subjects of sentences in front of strong, active verbs and avoid forms of the verb "to be"
**Use in-text citations including parenthetical references and a corresponding list of works cited at the end of the paper
**Use clauses and phrases for sentence variety
**Revise and edit writing for appropriate style and language in informal and formal contexts (11.6.d, 11.6.e, 11.6.f, 11.6.g, 11.6.h, 11.7.a, 11.7.b, 11.7.c, 11.7.d, 11.7.e, 11.7.f, 11.6.a, 11.6.b, 11.6.c)

3

2

Regular English 11-5.214Reading-O2.1

**Use roots and affixes to determine or clarify the meaning of words
**Demonstrate an understanding of idioms
**Identify allusions
**Interpret figures of speech (euphemism, oxymoron, hyperbole, paradox)
**Identify connotations of words with similar denotations
**Use context clues
**Consult reference materials to find pronunciation, meaning, part of speech, and etymology
**Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationship, and connotations in word meanings
**Use reading strategies to improve understanding (predicting, questioning, restating main idea, summarizing, and close reading)
**Analyze and critique themes across texts and within various social, cultural, and historical contexts and discuss how the subject matter, style, literary type, theme, and purpose reflect the culture and events of the times in which the works were written
**Compare and contrast literary movements (Colonialism/Puritanism, Revolutionary/Rationalism, Romanticism/Transcendentalism/Regionalism/Realism/Naturalism, Symbolism/Modernism/Harlem Renaissance/Postmodernism, Contemporary Poetry)
**Differentiate among archetypal characters (hero/heroine, trickster, faithful companion, outsider/outcast, rugged individualist, innocent, villain, caretaker, Earth mother, rebel, misfit, lonely orphan, shrew, mother/father figure, monster/villain, scapegoat)
**Identify major themes (American Dream, loss of innocence, coming of age, relationship with nature/society/science, alienation/isolation, survival of the fittest, disillusionment, rebellion/protest

In addition to the aforementioned, Honors English 11 will:

No matter the genre of literature, effective readers must actively interact with text.  Throughout the year, students can expect to study various modes of texts:
o              Short stories                        
o              Poetry
o              Novel
o              Nonfiction
The readers’ ability to infer (come to a conclusion or form an opinion about something on the basis of evidence or reasoning) both explicitly and implicitly are crucial components to effective reading comprehension at not only the secondary level but the collegiate, as well.
During the fourth nine weeks, students are expected to develop and maintain a Reader’s Notebook.  Readers will be expected to closely interact with various selections following stringent criteria.  These “interactions” must be housed within the Reader’s Notebook.
In the educational field, Professor Arthur Costa’s  3 – Level Inquiries has proven to be one of the most beneficial reading comprehension strategies.  If utilized correctly while reading, readers will comprehend literature successfully on many levels.
Level 1  – Explicit Questions:   These questions can be posed and answered directly from the text.
(define, describe, identify, name, recite, etc.)

Examples:               In order to help others on their journey, what object is offered by the fellow traveler in “Young Goodman Brown”? 

                                What object, belonging to Faith, hangs from a tree limb?                           

Level 2 – Implicit Questions:  These questions can be inferred from the text, but readers must analyze, compare, contrast, synthesize, etc.

Examples:              Early in the tale, Goodman Brown expresses his desire to return home, yet he continues to walk with his traveling companion.  What does this reveal about him?

                                What does Brown’s conversation with his wife and his conversation with the fellow traveler reveal about his personality?

Level 3 – Transcending Questions:   These questions go beyond what is stated or implied in the text.  Readers must speculate, evaluate, apply, hypothesize, etc.

Examples:              Goodman Brown dies a miserable man seemingly disillusioned by his peers.  What does                                         this behavior reveal about human nature?

Examine the customs and practices of the characters in this piece.  What does their   behavior reveal about the period in which the story is set?

With most (teacher discretion) works of literature, students are expected to annotate using the following criteria:

o              Circle phrases/concepts that are repetitive.  Many times themes, symbols, motifs, and figurative language are being established through repetition.
o              Underline sentences that stand out, develop an argument, or make a point.
o              [Bracket] important sections of text.
o              Summarize each paragraph/stanza in the margin.
o              Box words that need to be defined,  and define in the margin.  
o              Other annotating guidelines may be added as students read more specialized texts and subject matters.

In addition, Honors English 11 students must complete the following steps, which are directly relevant to the increases rigor of the Standards of Learning:
1.  Annotate each selection by following the aforementioned criteria. 
2.  Create one Level 1- Explicit Question.  Provide the answer as well.
3.  Create one Level 2 – Implicit Question.  Provide the answer as well.
4.  Create one Level 3 – Transcending Question.  Provide the answer as well.
5.  What is the main idea/main purpose/theme/author’s purpose in the passage? 
o              After responding in your words,  add key phrases from the selection that brought you to this conclusion.
6.  What is the main focus of each paragraph? 
o              After responding in your words,  add key phrases from the selection that brought you to this conclusion.
7.  Identify at least one upper level vocabulary word.  Define it based solely on the context clues surrounding that word.
8.  What is the tone of the selection?  Write down words from the text that establish the tone.
9.  List any archetypes present in the selection with a brief explanation.  Recall that you were given extensive notes during the first semester regarding literary archetypes (hero/heroine, trickster, faithful companion, outsider/outcast, rugged individualist, innocent, villain, caretaker, Earth mother, rebel, misfit, lonely orphan, shrew, mother/father figure, monster/villain, scapegoat, etc.)
10.  If reading poetry, address/label the following areas as they pertain to the subject, mood, and theme:
Rhyme    Rhythm  Onomatopoeia
Repetition             Alliteration            Assonance
Parallelism             Number Stanzas   Diction
(11.3.a, 11.3.b, 11.3.c, 11.3.d, 11.3.e, 11.3.f, 11.3.g)

5

2

Regular English 11-4.214Communication: Speaking, Listening, Media Literacy-O2.2

**Organize knowledge and display learning through visual images/graphics/music
**Evaluate visual and verbal media messages
**Determine author's purpose and distinguish factual content from opinion and possible bias
**Analyze and critique how media reach the targeted audience for specific purposes (persuade, entertain, provoke to action, appeal to ethics or beliefs)

In addition to the aforementioned, Honors English 11 will:
create and deliver many formal presentations - to persuade. (11.2.a, 11.2.b, 11.2.c, 11.2.d)

4

2

Regular English 11-7.214Research-O2.3

**Utilize technology to conduct research, organize information, and develop writing.
**Identify and narrow a topic for research with a variety of strategies (mapping, listing, brainstorming, webbing, and using an Internet search engine).
**Develop a plan to locate and collect relevant information.
**Identify a variety of primary and secondary sources.
**Generate notes while following a logical note-taking system.
**Preview resource materials to aid in selection of a suitable topic.
**Identify valid main and supporting ideas.
**Synthesize information in a logical sequence.
**Document and print electronic sources using MLA or APA style (in-text citation and works cited list).
**Incorporate ideas through directly quoting, paraphrasing, or summarizing (with appropriate citation).
**Edit for correct grammar, spelling, punctuation, and capitalization.
**Avoid plagiarism

 (11.8.a, 11.8.b, 11.8.c, 11.8.d, 11.8.e, 11.8.f, 11.8.g, 11.8.h, 11.8.i, 11.8.j)

7

2

Regular English 11-6.214Writing-O2.4

**Apply a variety of planning strategies to generate and organize ideas
**Present a thesis that focuses on the problem or argument to be solved
**Anticipate and address counterevidence, counterclaims, and counterarguments
**Use effective rhetorical appeals, to establish credibility and persuade intended audience
**Refine thesis (relevant, interesting, logical, meaningful)
**Understand a variety of organizational patterns
**Use appropriate and varied transitions to link sentences and paragraphs
**Elaborate ideas clearly and accurately
**Show evidence supporting arguments and justify evidence credibility
**Introduce claim, acknowledge and distinguish the claim from alternate or opposing claims
**Organize reasons and evidence logically
**Use specific revision strategies and adapt content, vocabulary, voice, and tone to audience, purpose, and situation
**Select an appropriate audience by analyzing assumptions, values, and background knowledge
**Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting facts, details, quotations, and examples for the audience and purpose
**Use MLA (Modern Language Association) or APA (American Psychological Association) style for formatting rules and documentation
**Apply MLA or APA style for punctuation conventions and formatting direct quotations
**Use verbal phrases correctly (gerund phrase, infinitive phrase, participial phrase, and absolute phrase)
**Place main subjects of sentences in front of strong, active verbs and avoid forms of the verb "to be"
**Use in-text citations including parenthetical references and a corresponding list of works cited at the end of the paper
**Use clauses and phrases for sentence variety
**Revise and edit writing for appropriate style and language in informal and formal contexts

In addition to the aforementioned, Honors English 11 will: (11.6.d, 11.6.e, 11.6.f, 11.6.g, 11.6.h, 11.7.a, 11.7.b, 11.7.c, 11.7.d, 11.7.e, 11.7.f, 11.6.a, 11.6.b, 11.6.c)

6

3

Regular English 11-9.214Writing-O3.1

**Apply a variety of planning strategies to generate and organize ideas
**Present a thesis that focuses on the problem or argument to be solved
**Anticipate and address counterevidence, counterclaims, and counterarguments
**Use effective rhetorical appeals, to establish credibility and persuade intended audience
**Refine thesis (relevant, interesting, logical, meaningful)
**Understand a variety of organizational patterns
**Use appropriate and varied transitions to link sentences and paragraphs
**Elaborate ideas clearly and accurately
**Show evidence supporting arguments and justify evidence credibility
**Introduce claim, acknowledge and distinguish the claim from alternate or opposing claims
**Organize reasons and evidence logically
**Use specific revision strategies and adapt content, vocabulary, voice, and tone to audience, purpose, and situation
**Select an appropriate audience by analyzing assumptions, values, and background knowledge
**Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting facts, details, quotations, and examples for the audience and purpose
**Use MLA (Modern Language Association) or APA (American Psychological Association) style for formatting rules and documentation
**Apply MLA or APA style for punctuation conventions and formatting direct quotations
**Use verbal phrases correctly (gerund phrase, infinitive phrase, participial phrase, and absolute phrase)
**Place main subjects of sentences in front of strong, active verbs and avoid forms of the verb "to be"
**Use in-text citations including parenthetical references and a corresponding list of works cited at the end of the paper
**Use clauses and phrases for sentence variety
**Revise and edit writing for appropriate style and language in informal and formal contexts

In addition to the aforementioned, Honors English 11 will: (11.6.d, 11.6.e, 11.6.f, 11.6.g, 11.6.h, 11.7.a, 11.7.b, 11.7.c, 11.7.d, 11.7.e, 11.7.f, 11.6.a, 11.6.b, 11.6.c)

9

3

Regular English 11-8.214Reading-O3.2

**Use roots and affixes to determine or clarify the meaning of words
**Demonstrate an understanding of idioms
**Identify allusions
**Interpret figures of speech (euphemism, oxymoron, hyperbole, paradox)
**Identify connotations of words with similar denotations
**Use context clues
**Consult reference materials to find pronunciation, meaning, part of speech, and etymology
**Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationship, and connotations in word meanings
**Use reading strategies to improve understanding (predicting, questioning, restating main idea, summarizing, and close reading)
**Analyze and critique themes across texts and within various social, cultural, and historical contexts and discuss how the subject matter, style, literary type, theme, and purpose reflect the culture and events of the times in which the works were written
**Compare and contrast literary movements (Colonialism/Puritanism, Revolutionary/Rationalism, Romanticism/Transcendentalism/Regionalism/Realism/Naturalism, Symbolism/Modernism/Harlem Renaissance/Postmodernism, Contemporary Poetry)
**Differentiate among archetypal characters (hero/heroine, trickster, faithful companion, outsider/outcast, rugged individualist, innocent, villain, caretaker, Earth mother, rebel, misfit, lonely orphan, shrew, mother/father figure, monster/villain, scapegoat)
**Identify major themes (American Dream, loss of innocence, coming of age, relationship with nature/society/science, alienation/isolation, survival of the fittest, disillusionment, rebellion/protest

In addition to the aforementioned, Honors English 11 will:
No matter the genre of literature, effective readers must actively interact with text.  Throughout the year, students can expect to study various modes of texts:
o              Short stories                        
o              Poetry
o              Novel
o              Nonfiction
The readers’ ability to infer (come to a conclusion or form an opinion about something on the basis of evidence or reasoning) both explicitly and implicitly are crucial components to effective reading comprehension at not only the secondary level but the collegiate, as well.
During the fourth nine weeks, students are expected to develop and maintain a Reader’s Notebook.  Readers will be expected to closely interact with various selections following stringent criteria.  These “interactions” must be housed within the Reader’s Notebook.
In the educational field, Professor Arthur Costa’s  3 – Level Inquiries has proven to be one of the most beneficial reading comprehension strategies.  If utilized correctly while reading, readers will comprehend literature successfully on many levels.
Level 1  – Explicit Questions:   These questions can be posed and answered directly from the text.
(define, describe, identify, name, recite, etc.)

Examples:               In order to help others on their journey, what object is offered by the fellow traveler in “Young Goodman Brown”? 

                                What object, belonging to Faith, hangs from a tree limb?                           

Level 2 – Implicit Questions:  These questions can be inferred from the text, but readers must analyze, compare, contrast, synthesize, etc.

Examples:              Early in the tale, Goodman Brown expresses his desire to return home, yet he continues to walk with his traveling companion.  What does this reveal about him?

                                What does Brown’s conversation with his wife and his conversation with the fellow traveler reveal about his personality?

Level 3 – Transcending Questions:   These questions go beyond what is stated or implied in the text.  Readers must speculate, evaluate, apply, hypothesize, etc.

Examples:              Goodman Brown dies a miserable man seemingly disillusioned by his peers.  What does                                         this behavior reveal about human nature?

Examine the customs and practices of the characters in this piece.  What does their   behavior reveal about the period in which the story is set?

With most (teacher discretion) works of literature, students are expected to annotate using the following criteria:

o              Circle phrases/concepts that are repetitive.  Many times themes, symbols, motifs, and figurative language are being established through repetition.
o              Underline sentences that stand out, develop an argument, or make a point.
o              [Bracket] important sections of text.
o              Summarize each paragraph/stanza in the margin.
o              Box words that need to be defined,  and define in the margin.  
o              Other annotating guidelines may be added as students read more specialized texts and subject matters.

In addition, Honors English 11 students must complete the following steps, which are directly relevant to the increases rigor of the Standards of Learning:
1.  Annotate each selection by following the aforementioned criteria. 
2.  Create one Level 1- Explicit Question.  Provide the answer as well.
3.  Create one Level 2 – Implicit Question.  Provide the answer as well.
4.  Create one Level 3 – Transcending Question.  Provide the answer as well.
5.  What is the main idea/main purpose/theme/author’s purpose in the passage? 
o              After responding in your words,  add key phrases from the selection that brought you to this conclusion.
6.  What is the main focus of each paragraph? 
o              After responding in your words,  add key phrases from the selection that brought you to this conclusion.
7.  Identify at least one upper level vocabulary word.  Define it based solely on the context clues surrounding that word.
8.  What is the tone of the selection?  Write down words from the text that establish the tone.
9.  List any archetypes present in the selection with a brief explanation.  Recall that you were given extensive notes during the first semester regarding literary archetypes (hero/heroine, trickster, faithful companion, outsider/outcast, rugged individualist, innocent, villain, caretaker, Earth mother, rebel, misfit, lonely orphan, shrew, mother/father figure, monster/villain, scapegoat, etc.)
10.  If reading poetry, address/label the following areas as they pertain to the subject, mood, and theme:
Rhyme    Rhythm  Onomatopoeia
Repetition             Alliteration            Assonance
Parallelism             Number Stanzas   Diction
(11.3.a, 11.3.b, 11.3.c, 11.3.d, 11.3.e, 11.3.f, 11.3.g, 11.4.a, 11.4.b, 11.4.c, 11.4.d, 11.4.e, 11.4.f, 11.4.g, 11.4.h, 11.4.i, 11.4.j, 11.4.k)

8

4

Regular English 11-13.214Research-O4.1

**Utilize technology to conduct research, organize information, and develop writing.
**Identify and narrow a topic for research with a variety of strategies (mapping, listing, brainstorming, webbing, and using an Internet search engine).
**Develop a plan to locate and collect relevant information.
**Identify a variety of primary and secondary sources.
**Generate notes while following a logical note-taking system.
**Preview resource materials to aid in selection of a suitable topic.
**Identify valid main and supporting ideas.
**Synthesize information in a logical sequence.
**Document and print electronic sources using MLA or APA style (in-text citation and works cited list).
**Incorporate ideas through directly quoting, paraphrasing, or summarizing (with appropriate citation).
**Edit for correct grammar, spelling, punctuation, and capitalization.
**Avoid plagiarism

 (11.8.a, 11.8.b, 11.8.c, 11.8.d, 11.8.e, 11.8.f, 11.8.g, 11.8.h, 11.8.i, 11.8.j)

13

4

Regular English 11-12.214Writing-O4.2

**Apply a variety of planning strategies to generate and organize ideas
**Present a thesis that focuses on the problem or argument to be solved
**Anticipate and address counterevidence, counterclaims, and counterarguments
**Use effective rhetorical appeals, to establish credibility and persuade intended audience
**Refine thesis (relevant, interesting, logical, meaningful)
**Understand a variety of organizational patterns
**Use appropriate and varied transitions to link sentences and paragraphs
**Elaborate ideas clearly and accurately
**Show evidence supporting arguments and justify evidence credibility
**Introduce claim, acknowledge and distinguish the claim from alternate or opposing claims
**Organize reasons and evidence logically
**Use specific revision strategies and adapt content, vocabulary, voice, and tone to audience, purpose, and situation
**Select an appropriate audience by analyzing assumptions, values, and background knowledge
**Develop the topic thoroughly by selecting facts, details, quotations, and examples for the audience and purpose
**Use MLA (Modern Language Association) or APA (American Psychological Association) style for formatting rules and documentation
**Apply MLA or APA style for punctuation conventions and formatting direct quotations
**Use verbal phrases correctly (gerund phrase, infinitive phrase, participial phrase, and absolute phrase)
**Place main subjects of sentences in front of strong, active verbs and avoid forms of the verb "to be"
**Use in-text citations including parenthetical references and a corresponding list of works cited at the end of the paper
**Use clauses and phrases for sentence variety
**Revise and edit writing for appropriate style and language in informal and formal contexts

 (11.6.d, 11.6.e, 11.6.f, 11.6.g, 11.6.h, 11.7.a, 11.7.b, 11.7.c, 11.7.d, 11.7.e, 11.7.f, 11.6.a, 11.6.b, 11.6.c)

12

4

Regular English 11-11.214Reading-O4.3

**Use roots and affixes to determine or clarify the meaning of words
**Demonstrate an understanding of idioms
**Identify allusions
**Interpret figures of speech (euphemism, oxymoron, hyperbole, paradox)
**Identify connotations of words with similar denotations
**Use context clues
**Consult reference materials to find pronunciation, meaning, part of speech, and etymology
**Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationship, and connotations in word meanings
**Use reading strategies to improve understanding (predicting, questioning, restating main idea, summarizing, and close reading)
**Analyze and critique themes across texts and within various social, cultural, and historical contexts and discuss how the subject matter, style, literary type, theme, and purpose reflect the culture and events of the times in which the works were written
**Compare and contrast literary movements (Colonialism/Puritanism, Revolutionary/Rationalism, Romanticism/Transcendentalism/Regionalism/Realism/Naturalism, Symbolism/Modernism/Harlem Renaissance/Postmodernism, Contemporary Poetry)
**Differentiate among archetypal characters (hero/heroine, trickster, faithful companion, outsider/outcast, rugged individualist, innocent, villain, caretaker, Earth mother, rebel, misfit, lonely orphan, shrew, mother/father figure, monster/villain, scapegoat)
**Identify major themes (American Dream, loss of innocence, coming of age, relationship with nature/society/science, alienation/isolation, survival of the fittest, disillusionment, rebellion/protest

In addition to the aforementioned, Honors English 11 will:
No matter the genre of literature, effective readers must actively interact with text.  Throughout the year, students can expect to study various modes of texts:
o              Short stories                        
o              Poetry
o              Novel
o              Nonfiction
The readers’ ability to infer (come to a conclusion or form an opinion about something on the basis of evidence or reasoning) both explicitly and implicitly are crucial components to effective reading comprehension at not only the secondary level but the collegiate, as well.
During the fourth nine weeks, students are expected to develop and maintain a Reader’s Notebook.  Readers will be expected to closely interact with various selections following stringent criteria.  These “interactions” must be housed within the Reader’s Notebook.
In the educational field, Professor Arthur Costa’s  3 – Level Inquiries has proven to be one of the most beneficial reading comprehension strategies.  If utilized correctly while reading, readers will comprehend literature successfully on many levels.
Level 1  – Explicit Questions:   These questions can be posed and answered directly from the text.
(define, describe, identify, name, recite, etc.)

Examples:               In order to help others on their journey, what object is offered by the fellow traveler in “Young Goodman Brown”? 

                                What object, belonging to Faith, hangs from a tree limb?                           

Level 2 – Implicit Questions:  These questions can be inferred from the text, but readers must analyze, compare, contrast, synthesize, etc.

Examples:              Early in the tale, Goodman Brown expresses his desire to return home, yet he continues to walk with his traveling companion.  What does this reveal about him?

                                What does Brown’s conversation with his wife and his conversation with the fellow traveler reveal about his personality?

Level 3 – Transcending Questions:   These questions go beyond what is stated or implied in the text.  Readers must speculate, evaluate, apply, hypothesize, etc.

Examples:              Goodman Brown dies a miserable man seemingly disillusioned by his peers.  What does                                         this behavior reveal about human nature?

Examine the customs and practices of the characters in this piece.  What does their   behavior reveal about the period in which the story is set?

With most (teacher discretion) works of literature, students are expected to annotate using the following criteria:

o              Circle phrases/concepts that are repetitive.  Many times themes, symbols, motifs, and figurative language are being established through repetition.
o              Underline sentences that stand out, develop an argument, or make a point.
o              [Bracket] important sections of text.
o              Summarize each paragraph/stanza in the margin.
o              Box words that need to be defined,  and define in the margin.  
o              Other annotating guidelines may be added as students read more specialized texts and subject matters.

In addition, Honors English 11 students must complete the following steps, which are directly relevant to the increases rigor of the Standards of Learning:
1.  Annotate each selection by following the aforementioned criteria. 
2.  Create one Level 1- Explicit Question.  Provide the answer as well.
3.  Create one Level 2 – Implicit Question.  Provide the answer as well.
4.  Create one Level 3 – Transcending Question.  Provide the answer as well.
5.  What is the main idea/main purpose/theme/author’s purpose in the passage? 
o              After responding in your words,  add key phrases from the selection that brought you to this conclusion.
6.  What is the main focus of each paragraph? 
o              After responding in your words,  add key phrases from the selection that brought you to this conclusion.
7.  Identify at least one upper level vocabulary word.  Define it based solely on the context clues surrounding that word.
8.  What is the tone of the selection?  Write down words from the text that establish the tone.
9.  List any archetypes present in the selection with a brief explanation.  Recall that you were given extensive notes during the first semester regarding literary archetypes (hero/heroine, trickster, faithful companion, outsider/outcast, rugged individualist, innocent, villain, caretaker, Earth mother, rebel, misfit, lonely orphan, shrew, mother/father figure, monster/villain, scapegoat, etc.)
10.  If reading poetry, address/label the following areas as they pertain to the subject, mood, and theme:
Rhyme    Rhythm  Onomatopoeia
Repetition             Alliteration            Assonance
Parallelism             Number Stanzas   Diction
(11.3.a, 11.3.b, 11.3.c, 11.3.d, 11.3.e, 11.3.f, 11.3.g, 11.4.a, 11.4.b, 11.4.c, 11.4.d, 11.4.e, 11.4.f, 11.4.g, 11.4.h, 11.4.i, 11.4.j, 11.4.k, 11.5.a, 11.5.b, 11.5.c, 11.5.d, 11.5.e, 11.5.f, 11.5.g, 11.5.h)

11

4

Regular English 11-10.214Communication: Speaking, Listening, Media Literacy-O4.4

**Define a position and select evidence to support a position
**Establish a purpose
**Develop well-organized presentations to defend a position or present information
**Apply and evaluate persuasive rhetorical devices and techniques (rhetorical questioning, parallel structure, metaphor, imagery, figures of speech, alliterative expressions, etc.)
**Use effective evidence and oral-delivery skills to convince an audience
**Develop effective multimedia presentations
**Organize knowledge and display learning through visual images/graphics/music
**Evaluate visual and verbal media messages
**Determine author's purpose and distinguish factual content from opinion and possible bias
**Analyze and critique how media reach the targeted audience for specific purposes (persuade, entertain, provoke to action, appeal to ethics or beliefs)

 (11.1.a, 11.1.b, 11.1.c, 11.1.d, 11.1.e, 11.1.f, 11.1.g, 11.1.h, 11.2.a, 11.2.b, 11.2.c, 11.2.d)

10

Curriculum Expectations:   English 12 (High School ELA)
Local VA Standards (End of Course Expectations)
Linked Core Standard:
By the end of English 12, the student will:


LVAS

Local VA Standard

Domain

1

develop skills in creating expository, technical, and persuasive/argumentative writings.
•             The intent of this standard is that students will develop skill in creating expository, technical, and persuasive/argumentative writings.
•             Persuasive techniques are defined under SOL 12.5.
•             Students should have practice writing for shorter time frames as well as extended time frames.
•             Students will understand and apply mechanics, usage, and grammar conventions to prepare writing for intended audiences.
•             Students will understand that usage is a matter of convention, can change over time, and is sometimes contested.
•             Students will use a style manual, such as MLA or APA, to apply punctuation rules and the formatting of quotations in documented papers.

Writing

2

write documented research papers and/or create a research project.
•             Students will research topics and develop documented papers that support a thesis. A documented paper is the result of following a process leading to discovery of information that is then synthesized to support a focus on a particular topic through content, style, structure, and presentation.
•             Students will recognize consequences of plagiarism according to the guidelines established by school divisions or post-secondary schools.

Research

3

communicate effectively during both formal and informal presentations, individually and as a group.
•             Students will develop skills in preparing and delivering formal oral presentations. To this end, they will develop skills in identifying a purpose, researching topics, developing content, and delivering presentations.

Communication: Speaking, Listening, Media Literacy

4

read, comprehend, and analyze the development of British literature and literature of other cultures.

•             The intent of this standard is that students will increase their independence as learners of vocabulary.
•             Students will be exposed to affixes, including prefixes and suffixes, roots, derivations, and inflections of polysyllabic words and understand that words with similar parts may be related to each other in meaning and origin.
•             Teachers should use a study of cognates, words from the same linguistic family, to enhance vocabulary instruction. Cognates can occur within the same language or across languages, e.g.,  night (English), nuit (French), Nacht (German), nacht (Dutch), nicht (Scots), natt (Swedish, Norwegian), nat (Danish), raat (Urdu), nátt (Faroese), nótt (Icelandic), noc (Czech, Slovak, Polish).
•             Students will evaluate the use of figurative language and analogies in text.
•             Students will use context and connotations to help determine the meaning of synonymous words and appreciate an author’s choices of words and images.
•             Connotation is subjective, cultural, and emotional. A stubborn person may be described as being either strong-willed or pig-headed.
They have the same literal meaning (i.e., stubborn). Strong-willed connotes admiration for the level of someone's will, while pig-headed connotes frustration in dealing with someone.
•             Denotation is a dictionary definition of a word.
•             Idiom is an expression peculiar to a particular language or group of people that means something different from the dictionary definition (e.g., blessing in disguise, chip on your shoulder).
•             An allusion is an indirect reference to a person, place, event, or thing – real or fictional.  J.D. Salinger's  The Catcher in the Rye is an allusion to a poem by Robert Burns. Stephen Vincent Benet's story By the Waters of Babylon  alludes to Psalm 137 in the Bible .

 

Reading

Instructional Objective (End of Term Expectations)


Term

Instructional Objective
Number

 Instructional Objective  (VASoL)

LVAS

1

English 12-4.217Reading-O1.1

appraise, compare, contrast, describe, interpret, and evaluate chronologically British literary periods and at least one work from that period –  a novel, a poem, a short story, etc.  (1st Nine Weeks -  Anglo-Saxon and Medieval Period, 2nd Nine Weeks - The English Renaissance, 3rd Nine Weeks The English Renaissance cont. and Romanticism, 4th Nine Weeks - Romanticism cont. and The Victorian Period).

•              use roots or affixes to determine or clarify the meaning of words.
•              demonstrate an understanding of idioms.
•              use prior reading knowledge and other study to identify the meaning of literary and classical allusions.
•              interpret figures of speech (e.g., euphemism, oxymoron, hyperbole, paradox) in context and analyze their role in the text.
•              analyze connotations of words with similar denotations.
•              use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
•              identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different
meanings or parts of speech (e.g., conceive, conception, conceivable).
•              consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech, its etymology, or its standard usage.
•              demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and connotations in word meanings.
•              use reading strategies to improve comprehension and to achieve the purposes for reading:  predicting and adjusting predictions; questioning the text; restating main ideas and summarizing supporting details; and close reading.
•              analyze texts to identify the author’s attitudes, viewpoints, and beliefs and critique how these relate to larger historical, social, and cultural contexts.
•              analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different  media.
•              identify the literary characteristics of specific eras, such as:
Anglo-Saxon/Medieval period;
Tudor/Renaissance period;
Neoclassical period;
Restoration Age;
Romantic and Victorian periods; and
Modern and Postmodern periods.
•              recognize major themes and issues related to:
religious diversity;
political struggles;
ethnic and cultural mores and traditions; and
individual rights, gender equity, and civil rights.
•              distinguish between what is directly stated in a text from what is intended or implied because of the use of satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement.
•              analyze how British literature has provided social commentary on various cultural developments including religious and political struggles, changing mores and traditions, etc.
•              explain how the choice of words in a poem creates tone.
•              explain how the reader’s response to the poem is manipulated by imagery, figures of speech, and diction (word choice).
•              compare and contrast traditional and contemporary poetry and drama from many cultures.
•              explain how a dramatist uses dialogue to reveal the theme of a drama.
•              compare and contrast the use of exposition/initiating event, rising action, complication/conflict, climax or crisis, falling action, and resolution/denouement among plays from various cultures.
•              before, during, and after reading texts, generate and respond to a variety of critical thinking questions to activate prior knowledge, engage actively with learning new information, and reflect on new learning or fresh insights.
•              analyze printed and Web-based informational and technical texts.
•              examine the format (structure) of an informational or technical text as an aid to determining and analyzing its content.
•              recognize and apply specialized vocabulary.
•              analyze how two or more texts develop and treat the same idea.
•              determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective,
•              make frequent references to texts in order to verify conclusions and support logical inferences.

 
(12.3.a, 12.3.b, 12.3.c, 12.3.d, 12.3.e, 12.3.f, 12.4.a, 12.4.b, 12.4.c, 12.4.d, 12.4.e, 12.4.f, 12.4.g, 12.4.h, 12.4.i, 12.5 .a, 12.5 .b, 12.5 .c, 12.5 .d, 12.5 .e, 12.5 .f)

4

1

English 12-1.217Writing-O1.2

develop expository writings that:
•              create cohesion and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.
•              elaborate for clarity and accuracy developing the topic fully with significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, and important quotations.
•              develop ideas in a logical sequence.
•              establish and maintain a style and tone.
•              apply persuasive rhetorical devices and techniques including rhetorical questioning, parallel structuring, metaphor, imagery, figures of speech, alliterative expressions, etc., when appropriate.
•              recognize and avoid common logical fallacies or false premises.
•              revise writing to provide depth of information and to adhere to presentation format.
•              use computer technology as available to edit writing before submitting the final copy.
•              assess and strengthen the quality of writing through revision.
•              use a variety of strategies (e.g., reading the draft aloud; peer feedback; using a rubric; reading the draft from the perspective of the intended audience) to evaluate whether the draft is effectively supported and adequately developed.
•              edit both one’s own and others’ work for grammar, style and tone appropriate to audience, purpose and context.
•              apply MLA or APA style for punctuation conventions and formatting direct quotations, particularly for in-text citation in documented papers.

 

 

Create a minimum of two (2) writing assignments each nine weeks.   The length and topic of each writing assignment will vary on each occasion.  Students will be graded on their ability to express themselves appropriately  and their ability to adhere to the instructions of the assignment(s) while incorporating correct grammar and spelling usage into their work.

  (12.6.a, 12.6.b, 12.6.c, 12.6.d, 12.6.e, 12.6.f, 12.6.g, 12.6.h, 12.7.a, 12.7.b, 12.7.c)

1

1

English 12-3.217Communication: Speaking, Listening, Media Literacy-O1.2

demonstrate oral proficiency while making formal and informal presentations in a group or individually.

•              make a 5-10 minute oral presentation alone and/or as part of a group.
•              organize and develop a speech, using steps in the process such as: selection of a topic related to audience and situation; determination of purpose; research; development of an outline, including introduction, body, and conclusion; practice; and presentation.
•              choose appropriate vocabulary, language, and tone for the selected topic,  purpose, context, and audience.
•              develop content through inclusion of: a combination of facts and/or statistics; examples; illustrations; anecdotes and narratives; reference to experts; quotations; analogies and comparisons; and logical argumentation of their reasoning.
•              use effective delivery created through a combination of: clear purpose; organization and development of content; semantics; rhetoric; visual aids; voice modulation and strength; gestures, stance, and eye contact; and sufficient practice of delivery.
•              use appropriate and effective visual aids and/or technology to support presentations.
•              use grammatically correct language and appropriate vocabulary.
•              work together to establish group goals, define individual roles, and report on learning activities. 
•              evaluate a formal presentation by analyzing and critiquing the effectiveness of the speaker’s demeanor, voice, language, gestures, clarity of thought, organization of evidence, relevance, and delivery.
•              monitor audience feedback, engagement, and understanding, to adjust delivery and content.
•              analyze and critique the effectiveness of purpose and content of a presentation with respect to how the audience responds.

 (12.1.a, 12.1.b, 12.1.c, 12.1.d, 12.1.e, 12.1.f, 12.1.g, 12.1.h, 12.1.i, 12.2.a, 12.2.b)

3

2

English 12-1.217Writing-O2.1

develop expository writings that:
•              create cohesion and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.
•              elaborate for clarity and accuracy developing the topic fully with significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, and important quotations.
•              develop ideas in a logical sequence.
•              establish and maintain a style and tone.
•              apply persuasive rhetorical devices and techniques including rhetorical questioning, parallel structuring, metaphor, imagery, figures of speech, alliterative expressions, etc., when appropriate.
•              recognize and avoid common logical fallacies or false premises.
•              revise writing to provide depth of information and to adhere to presentation format.
•              use computer technology as available to edit writing before submitting the final copy.
•              assess and strengthen the quality of writing through revision.
•              use a variety of strategies (e.g., reading the draft aloud; peer feedback; using a rubric; reading the draft from the perspective of the intended audience) to evaluate whether the draft is effectively supported and adequately developed.
•              edit both one’s own and others’ work for grammar, style and tone appropriate to audience, purpose and context.
•              apply MLA or APA style for punctuation conventions and formatting direct quotations, particularly for in-text citation in documented papers.
(12.6.a, 12.6.b, 12.6.c, 12.6.d, 12.6.e, 12.6.f, 12.6.g, 12.6.h, 12.7.a, 12.7.b, 12.7.c)

1

2

English 12-4.217Reading-O2.2

appraise, compare, contrast, describe, interpret, and evaluate chronologically British literary periods and at least one work from that period –  a novel, a poem, a short story, etc.  (1st Nine Weeks -  Anglo-Saxon and Medieval Period, 2nd Nine Weeks - The English Renaissance, 3rd Nine Weeks The English Renaissance cont. and Romanticism, 4th Nine Weeks - Romanticism cont. and The Victorian Period).

•              use roots or affixes to determine or clarify the meaning of words.
•              demonstrate an understanding of idioms.
•              use prior reading knowledge and other study to identify the meaning of literary and classical allusions.
•              interpret figures of speech (e.g., euphemism, oxymoron, hyperbole, paradox) in context and analyze their role in the text.
•              analyze connotations of words with similar denotations.
•              use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
•              identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different
meanings or parts of speech (e.g., conceive, conception, conceivable).
•              consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech, its etymology, or its standard usage.
•              demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and connotations in word meanings.
•              use reading strategies to improve comprehension and to achieve the purposes for reading:  predicting and adjusting predictions; questioning the text; restating main ideas and summarizing supporting details; and close reading.
•              analyze texts to identify the author’s attitudes, viewpoints, and beliefs and critique how these relate to larger historical, social, and cultural contexts.
•              analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different  media.
•              identify the literary characteristics of specific eras, such as:
Anglo-Saxon/Medieval period;
Tudor/Renaissance period;
Neoclassical period;
Restoration Age;
Romantic and Victorian periods; and
Modern and Postmodern periods.
•              recognize major themes and issues related to:
religious diversity;
political struggles;
ethnic and cultural mores and traditions; and
individual rights, gender equity, and civil rights.
•              distinguish between what is directly stated in a text from what is intended or implied because of the use of satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement.
•              analyze how British literature has provided social commentary on various cultural developments including religious and political struggles, changing mores and traditions, etc.
•              explain how the choice of words in a poem creates tone.
•              explain how the reader’s response to the poem is manipulated by imagery, figures of speech, and diction (word choice).
•              compare and contrast traditional and contemporary poetry and drama from many cultures.
•              explain how a dramatist uses dialogue to reveal the theme of a drama.
•              compare and contrast the use of exposition/initiating event, rising action, complication/conflict, climax or crisis, falling action, and resolution/denouement among plays from various cultures.
•              before, during, and after reading texts, generate and respond to a variety of critical thinking questions to activate prior knowledge, engage actively with learning new information, and reflect on new learning or fresh insights.
•              analyze printed and Web-based informational and technical texts.
•              examine the format (structure) of an informational or technical text as an aid to determining and analyzing its content.
•              recognize and apply specialized vocabulary.
•              analyze how two or more texts develop and treat the same idea.
•              determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective,
•              make frequent references to texts in order to verify conclusions and support logical inferences.

 
(12.3.a, 12.3.b, 12.3.c, 12.3.d, 12.3.e, 12.3.f, 12.4.a, 12.4.b, 12.4.c, 12.4.d, 12.4.e, 12.4.f, 12.4.g, 12.4.h, 12.4.i, 12.5 .a, 12.5 .b, 12.5 .c, 12.5 .d, 12.5 .e, 12.5 .f)

4

2

English 12-3.217Communication: Speaking, Listening, Media Literacy-O2.3

make a 5-10 minute oral presentation alone and/or as part of a group.
•              organize and develop a speech, using steps in the process such as:
selection of a topic related to audience and situation;
determination of purpose;
research;
development of an outline, including introduction, body, and conclusion;
practice; and
presentation.
•              choose appropriate vocabulary, language, and tone for the selected topic,  purpose, context, and audience.
•              develop content through inclusion of:
a combination of facts and/or statistics;
examples;
illustrations;
anecdotes and narratives;
reference to experts;
quotations;
analogies and comparisons; and
logical argumentation of their reasoning.
•              use effective delivery created through a combination of:
clear purpose;
organization and development of content;
semantics;
rhetoric;
visual aids;
voice modulation and strength;
gestures, stance, and eye contact; and
sufficient practice of delivery.
•              use appropriate and effective visual aids and/or technology to support presentations.
•              use grammatically correct language and appropriate vocabulary.
•              work together to establish group goals, define individual roles, and report on learning activities. 
•              evaluate a formal presentation by analyzing and critiquing the effectiveness of the speaker’s demeanor, voice, language, gestures, clarity of thought, organization of evidence, relevance, and delivery.
•              monitor audience feedback, engagement, and understanding, to adjust delivery and content.
•              analyze and critique the effectiveness of purpose and content of a presentation with respect to how the audience responds. (12.1.a, 12.1.b, 12.1.c, 12.1.d, 12.1.e, 12.1.f, 12.1.g, 12.1.h, 12.1.i, 12.2.a, 12.2.b)

3

3

English 12-2.217Research-O3.1

•              identify and narrow a topic for research through a variety of strategies, such as mapping, listing, brainstorming, webbing, and using an Internet search engine.
•              utilize technology to conduct research, organize information, and develop writing.
•              collect, evaluate, analyze and synthesize relevant information, using a variety of primary and secondary print and electronic sources.
•              evaluate collected information from print and electronic sources by:
determining its validity, accuracy, credibility, reliability, consistency,
strengths and limitations; and
formulating a reason/focus to represent findings.
•              record and organize information into a draft by:
prioritizing and synthesizing information;
summarizing and/or paraphrasing information; and
selecting direct quotations.
•              cite print or electronic sources of information to avoid plagiarism when paraphrasing, summarizing, quoting, or inserting graphics, using MLA or APA style.
•              edit writing for correct use of language, capitalization, punctuation, and
spelling.
•              demonstrate a sophisticated understanding of the ethics of writing by:
understanding  that plagiarism is the act of presenting someone else’s ideas as one’s own;
recognizing that one must correctly cite sources to give credit to the author of an original work;
recognizing that sources of information must be cited even when the information has been paraphrased; and
using quotation marks when someone else’s exact words are quoted.
(12.8.a, 12.8.b, 12.8.c, 12.8.d, 12.8.e, 12.8.f, 12.8.g, 12.8.h)

2

3

English 12-4.217Reading-O3.1

appraise, compare, contrast, describe, interpret, and evaluate chronologically British literary periods and at least one work from that period –  a novel, a poem, a short story, etc.  (1st Nine Weeks -  Anglo-Saxon and Medieval Period, 2nd Nine Weeks - The English Renaissance, 3rd Nine Weeks The English Renaissance cont. and Romanticism, 4th Nine Weeks - Romanticism cont. and The Victorian Period).

•              use roots or affixes to determine or clarify the meaning of words.
•              demonstrate an understanding of idioms.
•              use prior reading knowledge and other study to identify the meaning of literary and classical allusions.
•              interpret figures of speech (e.g., euphemism, oxymoron, hyperbole, paradox) in context and analyze their role in the text.
•              analyze connotations of words with similar denotations.
•              use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
•              identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different
meanings or parts of speech (e.g., conceive, conception, conceivable).
•              consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech, its etymology, or its standard usage.
•              demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and connotations in word meanings.
•              use reading strategies to improve comprehension and to achieve the purposes for reading:  predicting and adjusting predictions; questioning the text; restating main ideas and summarizing supporting details; and close reading.
•              analyze texts to identify the author’s attitudes, viewpoints, and beliefs and critique how these relate to larger historical, social, and cultural contexts.
•              analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different  media.
•              identify the literary characteristics of specific eras, such as:
Anglo-Saxon/Medieval period;
Tudor/Renaissance period;
Neoclassical period;
Restoration Age;
Romantic and Victorian periods; and
Modern and Postmodern periods.
•              recognize major themes and issues related to:
religious diversity;
political struggles;
ethnic and cultural mores and traditions; and
individual rights, gender equity, and civil rights.
•              distinguish between what is directly stated in a text from what is intended or implied because of the use of satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement.
•              analyze how British literature has provided social commentary on various cultural developments including religious and political struggles, changing mores and traditions, etc.
•              explain how the choice of words in a poem creates tone.
•              explain how the reader’s response to the poem is manipulated by imagery, figures of speech, and diction (word choice).
•              compare and contrast traditional and contemporary poetry and drama from many cultures.
•              explain how a dramatist uses dialogue to reveal the theme of a drama.
•              compare and contrast the use of exposition/initiating event, rising action, complication/conflict, climax or crisis, falling action, and resolution/denouement among plays from various cultures.
•              before, during, and after reading texts, generate and respond to a variety of critical thinking questions to activate prior knowledge, engage actively with learning new information, and reflect on new learning or fresh insights.
•              analyze printed and Web-based informational and technical texts.
•              examine the format (structure) of an informational or technical text as an aid to determining and analyzing its content.
•              recognize and apply specialized vocabulary.
•              analyze how two or more texts develop and treat the same idea.
•              determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective,
•              make frequent references to texts in order to verify conclusions and support logical inferences.

 
(12.3.a, 12.3.b, 12.3.c, 12.3.d, 12.3.e, 12.3.f, 12.4.a, 12.4.b, 12.4.c, 12.4.d, 12.4.e, 12.4.f, 12.4.g, 12.4.h, 12.4.i, 12.5 .a, 12.5 .b, 12.5 .c, 12.5 .d, 12.5 .e, 12.5 .f)

4

3

English 12-1.217Writing-O3.1

develop expository writings that:
•              create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.
•              elaborate for clarity and accuracy developing the topic fully with significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, and important quotations.
•              develop ideas in a logical sequence.
•              establish and maintain a style and tone.
•              apply persuasive rhetorical devices and techniques including rhetorical questioning, parallel structuring, metaphor, imagery, figures of speech, alliterative expressions, etc., when appropriate.
•              recognize and avoid common logical fallacies or false premises.
•              revise writing to provide depth of information and to adhere to presentation format.
•              use computer technology as available to edit writing before submitting the final copy.
•              assess and strengthen the quality of writing through revision.
•              use a variety of strategies (e.g., reading the draft aloud; peer feedback; using a rubric; reading the draft from the perspective of the intended audience) to evaluate whether the draft is effectively supported and adequately developed.
•              edit both one’s own and others’ work for grammar, style and tone appropriate to audience, purpose and context.
•              apply MLA or APA style for punctuation conventions and formatting direct quotations, particularly for in-text citation in documented papers.
(12.6.a, 12.6.b, 12.6.c, 12.6.d, 12.6.e, 12.6.f, 12.6.g, 12.6.h, 12.7.a, 12.7.b, 12.7.c)

1

4

English 12-1.217Writing-O4.1

develop expository writings that:
•              create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.
•              elaborate for clarity and accuracy developing the topic fully with significant and relevant facts, extended definitions, concrete details, and important quotations.
•              develop ideas in a logical sequence.
•              establish and maintain a style and tone.
•              apply persuasive rhetorical devices and techniques including rhetorical questioning, parallel structuring, metaphor, imagery, figures of speech, alliterative expressions, etc., when appropriate.
•              recognize and avoid common logical fallacies or false premises.
•              revise writing to provide depth of information and to adhere to presentation format.
•              use computer technology as available to edit writing before submitting the final copy.
•              assess and strengthen the quality of writing through revision.
•              use a variety of strategies (e.g., reading the draft aloud; peer feedback; using a rubric; reading the draft from the perspective of the intended audience) to evaluate whether the draft is effectively supported and adequately developed.
•              edit both one’s own and others’ work for grammar, style and tone appropriate to audience, purpose and context.
•              apply MLA or APA style for punctuation conventions and formatting direct quotations, particularly for in-text citation in documented papers.
(12.6.a, 12.6.b, 12.6.c, 12.6.d, 12.6.e, 12.6.f, 12.6.g, 12.6.h, 12.7.a, 12.7.b, 12.7.c)

1

4

English 12-3.217Communication: Speaking, Listening, Media Literacy-O4.2

make a 5-10 minute oral presentation alone and/or as part of a group.
•              organize and develop a speech, using steps in the process such as:
selection of a topic related to audience and situation;
determination of purpose;
research;
development of an outline, including introduction, body, and conclusion;
practice; and
presentation.
•              choose appropriate vocabulary, language, and tone for the selected topic,  purpose, context, and audience.
•              develop content through inclusion of:
a combination of facts and/or statistics;
examples;
illustrations;
anecdotes and narratives;
reference to experts;
quotations;
analogies and comparisons; and
logical argumentation of their reasoning.
•              use effective delivery created through a combination of:
clear purpose;
organization and development of content;
semantics;
rhetoric;
visual aids;
voice modulation and strength;
gestures, stance, and eye contact; and
sufficient practice of delivery.
•              use appropriate and effective visual aids and/or technology to support presentations.
•              use grammatically correct language and appropriate vocabulary.
•              work together to establish group goals, define individual roles, and report on learning activities. 
•              evaluate a formal presentation by analyzing and critiquing the effectiveness of the speaker’s demeanor, voice, language, gestures, clarity of thought, organization of evidence, relevance, and delivery.
•              monitor audience feedback, engagement, and understanding, to adjust delivery and content.
•              analyze and critique the effectiveness of purpose and content of a presentation with respect to how the audience responds. (12.1.a, 12.1.b, 12.1.c, 12.1.d, 12.1.e, 12.1.f, 12.1.g, 12.1.h, 12.1.i, 12.2.a, 12.2.b)

3

4

English 12-4.217Reading-O4.3

appraise, compare, contrast, describe, interpret, and evaluate chronologically British literary periods and at least one work from that period –  a novel, a poem, a short story, etc.  (1st Nine Weeks -  Anglo-Saxon and Medieval Period, 2nd Nine Weeks - The English Renaissance, 3rd Nine Weeks The English Renaissance cont. and Romanticism, 4th Nine Weeks - Romanticism cont. and The Victorian Period).
•              Students will continue to develop media literacy by examining how media messages influence people’s beliefs and behaviors.
•              use roots or affixes to determine or clarify the meaning of words.
•              demonstrate an understanding of idioms.
•              use prior reading knowledge and other study to identify the meaning of literary and classical allusions.
•              interpret figures of speech (e.g., euphemism, oxymoron, hyperbole, paradox) in context and analyze their role in the text.
•              analyze connotations of words with similar denotations.
•              use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
•              identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different
meanings or parts of speech (e.g., conceive, conception, conceivable).
•              consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech, its etymology, or its standard usage.
•              demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and connotations in word meanings.
•              use reading strategies to improve comprehension and to achieve the purposes for reading:  predicting and adjusting predictions; questioning the text; restating main ideas and summarizing supporting details; and close reading.
•              analyze texts to identify the author’s attitudes, viewpoints, and beliefs and critique how these relate to larger historical, social, and cultural contexts.
•              analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different  media.
•              identify the literary characteristics of specific eras, such as:
Anglo-Saxon/Medieval period;
Tudor/Renaissance period;
Neoclassical period;
Restoration Age;
Romantic and Victorian periods; and
Modern and Postmodern periods.
•              recognize major themes and issues related to:
religious diversity;
political struggles;
ethnic and cultural mores and traditions; and
individual rights, gender equity, and civil rights.
•              distinguish between what is directly stated in a text from what is intended or implied because of the use of satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement.
•              analyze how British literature has provided social commentary on various cultural developments including religious and political struggles, changing mores and traditions, etc.
•              explain how the choice of words in a poem creates tone.
•              explain how the reader’s response to the poem is manipulated by imagery, figures of speech, and diction (word choice).
•              compare and contrast traditional and contemporary poetry and drama from many cultures.
•              explain how a dramatist uses dialogue to reveal the theme of a drama.
•              compare and contrast the use of exposition/initiating event, rising action, complication/conflict, climax or crisis, falling action, and resolution/denouement among plays from various cultures.
•              before, during, and after reading texts, generate and respond to a variety of critical thinking questions to activate prior knowledge, engage actively with learning new information, and reflect on new learning or fresh insights.
•              analyze printed and Web-based informational and technical texts.
•              examine the format (structure) of an informational or technical text as an aid to determining and analyzing its content.
•              recognize and apply specialized vocabulary.
•              analyze how two or more texts develop and treat the same idea.
•              determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective,
•              make frequent references to texts in order to verify conclusions and support logical inferences.

 
(12.3.a, 12.3.b, 12.3.c, 12.3.d, 12.3.e, 12.3.f, 12.4.a, 12.4.b, 12.4.c, 12.4.d, 12.4.e, 12.4.f, 12.4.g, 12.4.h, 12.4.i, 12.5 .a, 12.5 .b, 12.5 .c, 12.5 .d, 12.5 .e, 12.5 .f)

4

Curriculum Expectations:   AP English 12/Honors English 12 (High School ELA)
Local VA Standards (End of Course Expectations)
Linked Core Standard:
By the end of AP English 12/Honors English 12, the student will:


LVAS

Local VA Standard

Domain

1

-Use Literary Criticism such as Mythological, Archetypal and Psychological approaches to literary criticism. to analyze novels under the theme of the Novel and Society.

Reading

2

-Express ideas with clarity, coherence, conciseness, precision and fluency in written essays of 1200 to 1500 words and use the mythological, archetypal and/or psychological approach to literary criticism and at least two 15 minutes in-class essays with a word limit goal of 400 words.
Analyze/teach a 15 minute aspect of Hard Times, usually an assigned chapter to teach the students (oral presentation with written outlined notes).
Be assessed using the 5 point rubric on the Literary Analysis Criterion handed out at the beginning of the school year.

Writing

3

-Analyze "The Woman Question" as seen in various World Literature novels.

Reading

4

-Demonstrate a sound insight of the works chosen, provide sound evidence of careful reading and consideration of the works treated; display an appreciation of the quality or characteristics of a literary work from one culture or a sound appreciation of differences and/or similarities there may be between literary works from two distinct cultures.
-Write an assignment which displays inventiveness and individuality; will treat the chosen aspect in a way which is both interesting and appealing to the reader, and also reveals some originality in its approach; and will demonstrate and illustrate a point which is well though out, valid and highly relevant.
-Express him/herself with clarity, conciseness, coherence, fluency and linguistic precision; will demonstrate mastery of the language appropriate to the discussion of literature; will make a most effective choice of register, phraseology, idiom and style.

Writing

5

-Analyze poetry using the "Explication de texte" analysis process.
Read and analyze a play.

Reading

6

-Write an essay approximately 700-1000 words in length based on at least two poems and five passages of a play.
Write a 1000-1200 word essay on the Eclipse of Civility.
-The piece of work must be a cogent piece of writing and should include some introductory and concluding remarks.
-Content and Format Guidelines
-Introduction- a brief statement of aims
-Main Body- should reveal a student's insight into the works and a student's appreciation  of the chosen link or relationship between the works.
Conclusion- a brief summary and personal evaluation of what has been achieved/discussed.

Writing

7

-Read and analyze two Early Twentieth Century African American Authored novels.

Reading

8

-Demonstrate a sound insight of the works chosen, provide sound evidence of careful reading and consideration of the works treated; display an appreciation of the quality or characteristics of a literary work from one culture or a sound appreciation of differences and/or similarities there may be between literary works from two distinct cultures.
Write an assignment which displays inventiveness and individuality; will treat the chosen aspect in a way which is both interesting and appealing to the reader, and also reveals some originality in its approach; and will demonstrate and illustrate a point which is well though out, valid and highly relevant.
Express him/herself with clarity, conciseness, coherence, fluency and linguistic precision; will demonstrate mastery of the language appropriate to the discussion of literature; will make a most effective choice of register, phraseology, idiom and style.

Writing

Instructional Objective (End of Term Expectations)


Term

Instructional Objective
Number

 Instructional Objective  (VASoL)

LVAS

1

AP English 12-2.217Writing-O1.2

-The student will demonstrate an ability to express ideas with clarity, coherence, conciseness, precision and fluency in written essays. Essays will use the mythological, archetypal and/or psychological approach to literary criticism.
-The student will write one 1200-1500 word essay on Hard Times. One 700-1000 word essay on "Young Goodman Brown" and at least two 15 minutes in-class essays with a word limit goal of 400 words for each timed essay.
-The student will analyze/teach a 15 minute aspect of Hard Times, usually an assigned chapter to teach the students (oral presentation with written outlined notes).
-The student will be assessed using the 5 point rubric on the Literary Analysis Criterion handed out at the beginning of the school year. (12.6.a, 12.6.b, 12.6.c, 12.6.d, 12.6.e, 12.6.f, 12.6.g, 12.7.a, 12.7.b, 12.7.c)

2

1

AP English 12-1.217Reading-O1.3

- The student will be able to express ideas with clarity, coherence, conciseness, precision and fluency in both written essays concerning "Innocence Betrayed" in "Young Goodman Brown.
-The student will explore and identify the writer's technique and stylistic devices as well as the effect of those devices.
-The student will also comment on the tone used in the works of literature as well as the mood and the significance of key points, words, and/or phrases and the use of imagery.
-The student will also demonstrate a depth of understanding the theme of the works and identify the nine points of disillusionment as seen in "Young Goodman Brown" and how each one of those relate to the theme of innocence betrayed.
-The student will understand the term Utilitarianism in Hard Times and make a connection between the them of Utilitarianism and the conflict between the advocates of material prosperity and the exploitation of human beings at the expense of spiritual and esthetic values, a major theme of 19th century writings. (12.4.a, 12.4.b, 12.4.c, 12.4.d)

1

2

AP English 12-4.217Writing-O2.1

-The student will write an essay approximately 1200-1500 words in length based on at least two of the three works studied in the "Woman Question".
-The piece of work must be a cogent piece of writing and should include some introductory and concluding remarks.
-The assignment must focus on some link or relationship between the works; however, the link or relationship need not necessarily relate to the heading of the group from which the work has been taken, but may be any pertinent aspect.
-Content and Format Guidelines
-Introduction- a brief statement of aims
-Main Body- should reveal a student's insight into the works and a student's appreciation  of the chosen link or relationship between the works.
Conclusion- a brief summary and personal evaluation of what has been achieved/discussed. (12.6.a, 12.6.b, 12.6.c, 12.6.d, 12.6.e, 12.6.f, 12.6.g, 12.6.h, 12.7.a, 12.7.b, 12.7.c)

4

2

AP English 12-3.217Reading-O2.2

-The student will demonstrate an appreciation of similarities and differences between literary works from different ages and/or cultures. (12.4.a, 12.4.b, 12.4.c, 12.4.d, 12.4.e)

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AP English 12-5.217Reading-O3.1

-The student will demonstrate a comprehensive grasp of the significant ideas of works or passages; will place works or passages in precise context and provide accurate and detailed reference in support of his/her views.
-The student will show awareness of the author's use of stylistic devices and effects created.
-The student should aim to explore all significant aspects of the passage or poem.
-The student's interpretation should identify significant aspects and details.
-The student will appreciate the writer's technique, their use of stylistic devices and their effect on the reader.
-The student will identify tone and mood of the extract, the significance of key words or lines and the use of imagery. (12.4.f, 12.4.g, 12.4.h)

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AP English 12-6.217Writing-O3.2

-The student will write an essay approximately 700-1000 words in length based on at least two poems and five passages of Macbeth.
-The student will write a 1000-1200 word essay on the Eclipse of Civility in Macbeth.
-The piece of work must be a cogent piece of writing and should include some introductory and concluding remarks.
-Content and Format Guidelines
-Introduction- a brief statement of aims
-Main Body- should reveal a student's insight into the works and a student's appreciation  of the chosen link or relationship between the works.
Conclusion- a brief summary and personal evaluation of what has been achieved/discussed. (12.6.a, 12.6.b, 12.6.c, 12.6.d, 12.6.e, 12.6.f, 12.6.g, 12.6.h, 12.7.a, 12.7.b, 12.7.c)

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AP English 12-7.217Reading-O4.1

- The student will be able to express ideas with clarity, coherence, conciseness, precision and fluency in both written essays concerning the theme of Man and Society as seen in the works of Ellison and Wright.
-The student will study the black authors of the early 20th century.
-The student will refer to previously taught concepts and apply them in a discerning manner and will display understanding of the difference between life and literature.
-The student will demonstrate depth of understanding of dominate ideas and characteristic interest of the work, and be able to interpret them in a discerning manner. (12.4.a, 12.4.b, 12.4.c, 12.4.d, 12.4.e)

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AP English 12-8.217Writing-O4.2

-The student will write an essay approximately 1200-1500 words in length based the theme of Man and Society.
-The piece of work must be a cogent piece of writing and should include some introductory and concluding remarks.
-The assignment must focus on some link or relationship between the works; however, the link or relationship need not necessarily relate to the heading of the group from which the work has been taken, but may be any pertinent aspect.
-Content and Format Guidelines
-Introduction- a brief statement of aims
-Main Body- should reveal a student's insight into the works and a student's appreciation  of the chosen link or relationship between the works.
Conclusion- a brief summary and personal evaluation of what has been achieved/discussed. (12.6.a, 12.6.b, 12.6.c, 12.6.d, 12.6.e, 12.6.f, 12.6.g, 12.6.h, 12.7.a, 12.7.b, 12.7.c)

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Curriculum Expectations:   DC English 12 (High School ELA)
Local VA Standards (End of Course Expectations)
Linked Core Standard:
By the end of DC English 12, the student will:


LVAS

Local VA Standard

Domain

1

Create written pieces that demonstrate an ability to express ideas in clear, unified, coherent prose.  Practice the choices a writer must make in subject, pattern, tone, point of view, supportive detail, and diction. 

Writing

2

Students will develop skill in creating written pieces that demonstrate an ability to understand, summarize, paraphrase, and synthesize more than one text, using academic research.

Writing

3

Students will evaluate the validity, accuracy, credibility, reliability, and consistency of printed and web based source material.

Research

4

Students will create pieces of persuasive writing that demonstrate an understanding of persuasive techniques and strategies, including presentation of argument; supporting examples; addressing of counterclaims; refutation of counterclaims. 

Writing

5

Students will understand and apply mechanics, usage, and grammar conventions to generate coherent and effective pieces of writing.

Writing

6

Students will give oral presentations, demonstrating delivery skill, utilizing available technology, and presenting knowledge of a particular subject matter.

Communication: Speaking, Listening, Media Literacy

7

Students will make connections between fiction, nonfiction, and critical essays concerning thematic topics; analyze fiction using various critical approaches; recognize the use of literary elements and their purposes within works of fiction.

Reading

8

Students will create pieces of persuasive writing that demonstrate an understanding of persuasive techniques, particularly focusing on media analysis and deconstruction. 

Writing

9

 

Writing

Instructional Objective (End of Term Expectations)


Term

Instructional Objective
Number

 Instructional Objective  (VASoL)

LVAS

1

DC English 12-6.217Communication: Speaking, Listening, Media Literacy-O1.1

Create an oral presentation using available technology including PowerPoint, Prezi, or another visual presentation format.  Demonstrate ability to utilize voice to grasp audience attention:  clear enunciation, pause, volume; maintain consistent eye contact; use appropriate body language/gesturing; maintain consistent grammatical conventions in speech; clearly demonstrate knowledge of subject matter; readily answer audience questions.   (12.1.a, 12.1.b, 12.1.c, 12.1.d, 12.1.e)

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1

DC English 12-1.217Writing-O1.2

-Create pieces of writing that express ideas with a clear statement of the writer's purpose:  thesis.  Draft paragraphs that demonstrate knowledge of effective paragraph development:  clear topic sentence; relevant and surprising details and examples; vigorous, precise vocabulary; varied and interesting structure; clear command of transitional words and sentences; clearly identifiable authorial voice with a clear grasp of audience expectation.
- Create narrative essays of approximately 500-1000 words. (12.6.a, 12.6.d, 12.6.e, 12.6.h, 12.7.a, 12.7.b, 12.7.c)

1

1

DC English 12-5.217Writing-O1.3

Apply conventions of grammar, usage, and mechanics in the drafting and editing of written work.  Students will self and peer edit for common sentence errors, including run-on sentences, sentence fragments, commas splices; subject-verb agreement; pronoun-antecedent agreement; issues related to tense; passive voice versus active voice; concise and collegiate diction; spelling/typos; capitalization; punctuation, etc.  (12.6.h, 12.7.a, 12.7.b)

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1

DC English 12-2.217Writing-O1.4

-Create effective pieces of writing by first narrowing a topic for research and utilizing technology to conduct research and organize information. 
-Create thought-provoking pieces of writing that incorporate source material and demonstrate an ability to: present a clear, original thesis;  balance presentation of relevant and legitimate information that clearly supports a central purpose and shows a thoughtful, in-depth analysis of a significant topic; arrange ideas smoothly and logically to support the purpose or argument; maintain a consistently professional tone appropriate for an academic research paper;  craft well-phrased sentences that are varied in length and structure, flowing smoothly from one idea to another; make consistent, precise, and accurate word choice.
-Create writing that utilizes compelling evidence from professionally legitimate sources (database articles, peer reviewed journals, etc) to support claims with source attribution clearly and fairly represented; accurately summarize and paraphrase information from the source in students' own words.
-Avoid plagiarism and understand the school and college policy for academic integrity.
-Create researched essays of approximately 1,00-1,500 words. (12.6.a, 12.6.b, 12.6.c, 12.6.d, 12.6.e, 12.6.f, 12.6.g, 12.6.h, 12.7.a, 12.7.b, 12.7.c)

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DC English 12-3.217Research-O2.1

Evaluate the accuracy of source information using practical techniques, discerning: type of publication:  academic journal, non-academic article, blog, newspaper, magazine, etc.; authorship and author qualification; publication information (publisher, place of publication, date); documentation of quotation and sources information (Is such information available? clearly identifiable?); bias and/or affiliations, including one sided or sweeping arguments; URL (the domain name extension often indicates the type of group hosting the site); external links (on web sources).
-Distinguish between academic publications:  peer-revised journals, database generated articles, government reports, etc. and non academic sources such as Google generated articles, popular magazines. (12.8.a, 12.8.b, 12.8.c, 12.8.d, 12.8.e, 12.8.h)

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2

DC English 12-4.217Writing-O2.2

Create persuasive essays that include: 
-Precise and clear presentation of claim(s) or thesis
-Inclusion of relevant facts, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples from source material
-Skillfully integration of source information into the text, maintaining the flow of ideas and advancing the thesis
-Purposeful sequencing of claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence
-Provides a concluding statement or section that logically follows from and supports the argument presented
-Essays of approximately 1,000-1,500 words
(12.6.a, 12.6.b, 12.6.c, 12.6.d, 12.6.e, 12.6.f, 12.6.g, 12.6.h)

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DC English 12-7.217Reading-O3.1

-Develop an appreciation and enjoyment of literature as well as analytical perspectives and vocabularies that are portable to a variety of professions and disciplines.
-Master different strategies of interpretation and criticism and employ a sophisticated critical and theoretical vocabulary for literary analysis.
-Display expertise at analytical thinking in a variety of formats: short essays, research papers, and critical reviews of secondary sources (12.3.f, 12.4.c, 12.4.d, 12.4.h, 12.4.i, 12.5 .c, 12.5 .d)

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DC English 12-8.217Writing-O3.2

Students will deconstruct media messages, using analytical techniques, focusing on audience, text, subtext, persuasive techniques, point of view.

?              Identify the subtext of the media–subject /basic premise.  What is being sold?  What is the show/what does it concern?  What music genre is represented? 
?              Thesis:  the underlying message being conveyed/subject or idea being sold, etc.
IN DEPTH ANALYSIS/DECONSTRUCTION
?              Identify the conglomerate behind the media –who’s making the money?
?              Who is the “target audience”? What is their age, ethnicity, class, profession, interests, etc.? What words, images, or sounds suggest this?
?              What part of the story is not being told? What consequences of actions are not explained?  What false assertions are made? What false presentations of so called “reality” are made?  Is the ad/show/song truly a mirror of teen lives or is it making teens think that such lives should be their reality?
?              Who is being empowered/disempowered by the media?
?              Why are teens “buying” what is being sold?  Why is it enticing?
?              What is the negative effect of the media on the consumer/society at large?
?              What is something that teen consumers can/should do?
(12.6.b, 12.6.c, 12.6.d, 12.6.e, 12.6.f, 12.6.g, 12.6.h, 12.7.a, 12.7.b, 12.7.c)

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4

DC English 12-9.217Writing-O4.1

Students will argue a particular thesis with regard to one or more works of literature.
Essays of 1,000-1,500 words will demonstrate:
1.  Unified, original argument.
2.  Ideas or examples related clearly to a well-articulated central thesis.
3.  Quotations analyzed for clarify of relevance.
4.  A skillfully and accurately supported assertion of a character or interpretation of symbols, etc.
5.  Complex and varied sentences.
6.  Smooth integration of quotations that are punctuated correctly.
7.  Demonstration of mastery of grammatical elements, particularly eliminating sentence fragments, run-ons, comma splices, etc.
(12.6.c, 12.6.d, 12.6.f, 12.6.g, 12.6.h, 12.7.a, 12.7.b)

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